Saw bench refurbish

Hi there,
I wonder if anyone has any ideas about dismantling the drive shaft on
an old saw bench. It is obviously quite old, as I bought it about 30
years ago and it is a flat belt drive. On the frame it says Acrow
Walden (as in Acrowprop ?)
Holding the wheel on, is a left hand thread bolt which has lost its
head. It is 5/8 inch Whitworth diameter and 11 tpi. I need another
like this as it is too short to weld another head on. It needs to be
about 1 =BD inch long. Where could I get one? Please
I have taken some photos and these are shown here:
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The bearings are ball, - a bit worn and the shaft needs to be
dismantled to get at these. If anyone has any suggestions as to how it
comes apart, I would be very grateful. I have tentatively tapped it and
twisted it with a stilson but I am a bit reluctant to use a lot of
force and damage it. I took out all the screws that seem designed to
hold it together. When I do get it undone, I would like to convert to
"V" belts, but I wonder how much horsepower I will need with a 3
ft. saw wheel. I have a selection of engines from 1 Hp. up to 50 to
choose from.
Any comments would be very welcome.
Thanks, George.
Reply to
George
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A guy who posts on this group has a length of hex bar for making 5/8" BSW bolts and may chip in and offer to make one at a price.If you were on the doorstep I could make one from a bit of round bar and hex the head.It would not be cheap unless you were buying 100. Re the bearings,if possible take the shaft and bearings complete to an engineer. Re horsepower,for hand fed timber it is recommended 1.0 to 1.1/4hp per inch of diameter of the blade Mark.
Reply to
mark
here:
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OK, I'll bite
Yes, I've got some 5/8" Whit hex bar, mild steel, I could make you a LH bolt if you wish for small numbers of beer tokens.
Cheers Tim
Dutton Dry-Dock Traditional & Modern canal craft repairs Vintage diesel engine service
Reply to
Tim Leech
In article , " snipped-for-privacy@ems-fife.co.uk" writes
Wow, Mark - that sounds fearsome. I just checked my two sawbenches, and they are both approximately 2HP with 10" blades - about 0.2HP/inch.
These are home-use items rather than industrial, but they both cut pretty efficiently; I would have thought 1 - 1.25HP/inch would damn near put them into orbit.
David
Reply to
David Littlewood
Might sound fearsome but with a 36" blade you can cut 12/14" thick timber.Published figures not mine.I would be more worried about a 5/8" bolt holding it all together.Especially one that only cost ten pints. Mark.
Reply to
mark
My saw has, I think, 14" blades & a 3hp motor, but the original motor wa 5hp, I only have single phase where it is. It does struggle when using the max available depth.
Cheers Tim
Dutton Dry-Dock Traditional & Modern canal craft repairs Vintage diesel engine service
Reply to
Tim Leech
That would be in the right range if you used Mark's suggestion with depth of cut rather than dia.
Russell
Tim Leech wrote:
Reply to
Russell
Thanks for the useful comments. Today a friend and I managed to produce a perfect 5/8 LH thread Witworth bolt on his Myford, from hex stock. I think that this will be OK. There is a substantial locking pin and collar holding the blade to the boss.
I have a 40 Hp Fordson Power Major, but unfortunately no flat belt drive for it. Anyone got one? I still have a problem with disassembling the drive shaft. I do have an Asaa (Dutch) diesel which has a belt drive though. It needs a bit of work is all.
George
Reply to
George
how wide and diameter
Andrew
Reply to
Andrew Bishop
Hi George,
I like those engines shown on your site. They're a little unusual. Some people don't like the larger industrial engines, but I do. That single cylinder Lister looks like it could be restored, but it's going to be a challenge (of course, anything can be restored with enough time and money). I'd be interested to know how you get on. The end result would definitely be worth the effort!
Those Blackstones in the desert look unusual too. I don't think I've seen one quite like that before.
Best wishes,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Hi George. I think you're right about your saw being built by the original acrowprop folks, but I'm not exactly sure. As for the Fordson pulley, I think a mate has one on a hulk he's parting out. I'm going up tomorrow (Sat. 26/01/07) to do some gas axe work (well, BOC Bantam work at least) for him so I'll find out if it's spoken for. Is that a Ransomes Robin in your 4th photo?. Powerwise I was taught to measure the max blade height above the table and multiply this by 1.5 to get the horsepower. Some might say overkill, but it has never failed for me (the last 60" rackbench I rebuilt can slice 2' Coastal Redwood/Douglas Fir without making the engine bark!) HTH. Cheers, Scruff.
Reply to
scruffybugger
Thanks Scruff,
It is a 1960 4 cylinder diesel Fordson with a front end loader, I would be glad of a PTO flat belt pulley. The 4th photo shows my old single furrow plough that I am also straightening out, I haven't a clue who made it but I can easily take a better photo if you are interested. Is it interesting then? Will this sawbench be OK bolted to 4" of concrete in the drive?
Regards George.
Reply to
George
The pulley unit was already spoken for, sorry. 4" of good concrete=20 should be fine for a nice heavy saw like yours (they don't move much=20 when working). I have an old single furrow plough for beating the veg=20 plot into submission, but I could never be called a ploughman lol.=20 Some people seem quite happy to give frightening prices for ploughs...
Cheers, Scruff.
Reply to
scruffybugger
I got the end collar off by heating it, but I don't think I can heat up the pullies without the shaft getting just as hot. I have put a couple of pictures of the plough on the same page of my website:
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is a bracket stiking out one side that I have no idea of the function, got any idea?
Regards George.
Reply to
George
Looks like a leg to support the plough when it's not on the tractor. It should fold down somehow. Ransome stand legs were never the most meaty looking things, but were still more than capable of holding up the plough.
Reply to
moray

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