Shortening Brammer(?) T-Link belting advice

Hi,
My Boxford has the headstock driven from the countershaft by an orange-coloured T-Link belt which annoyingly slips at times. I've
tested the tension and it seems not to be very tight, but otoh, it doesn't seem to me that wrestling it by hand inside the cabinet is very likely to get the free ends close enough to close. Particularly since it'll take a hand on each end of the belt and a third on the link and I've only got the standard complement of two :-)
So, can anyone tell me how it's done ?
Also, as a subidiary question : if/when I let go of an end and it slithers up into the headstock, can anyone tell me how to get access to re-thread it ? The only likely candidate for access to a Boxford (MK III) headstock seems to be the plate with the backgear A/B position marking. Is this really the way in, or am I missing something ?
Thanks,
David
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On 3 Oct 2005 09:51:13 -0700, mangled snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Istr there being an adjustment on the countershaft on the Boxford I had?
Cheers Tim
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Hi Tim,
It's easy to adjust the tension of the belt between the motor and countershaft - perhaps it was that what you are thinking of ? The countershaft is fixed OTOH, there is nothing to adjust the belt tension AFAICS apart from shortening it.
Thanks,
David
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On 4 Oct 2005 00:21:02 -0700, mangled snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I do remember fitting a new top link belt to mine, a BUD. I remember it was quite fiddly but doable without tearing the whole machine to bits. Sorry I can't remember the details but it would be surprising if there were no adjustment at all. I did have the benefit of the little Boxford book.
When you've done it, try doing the same on a Denford Viceroy TDS. Now that *is* a struggle! <BG>
Cheers Tim
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I don't think there is any adjustment. What I did with mine is actually shim the countershaft mounting. (I actually got some dexian fasterners, about 1.5mm wide, look a little like large meccano and used them to adjust the countershaft).
Best regards, Dave Colliver. http://www.AshfieldFOCUS.com ~~ http://www.FOCUSPortals.com - Local franchises available
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Well, that's an idea but I'd really prefer just to take out a link. Does anyone know if there's a special tool available for this purpose or is it really just a case of main force ?
Thanks,
David
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On 5 Oct 2005 03:00:07 -0700, mangled snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

There is a special tool for the 'traditional' type of link belting, with metal pins through the links. A bit like cranked external circlip pliers. Maybe the same tool works for the T-link type, I've never tried that type. Ask at your neares transmissin/bearing suppliers.
Come to think of it, after years of adjusting link belting by hand, I may have actually bought my tool to help fitting the new belt to my Boxford <G>
Cheers Tim
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mangled snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com writes

>Yes there is a special tool, ask your belt supplier.
>Derek
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