Weight of hammers

Just bought a pair of Silverline ball peen hammers - a 32 oz and a 40 oz. The weights felt wrong so I weighed them - and the 32 oz weighs
MORE than the 40! Both have the weight printed on the head. Supplier keeps trying to replace the '40' but they supply a hammer weighing 36 oz including the handle.
My understanding is that hammer weights refer to the head but cannot find references to that - did I dream it? Can anyone confirm it?
AWEM
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That was always my understanding, but I never had occaision to check the weights. On the other hand you can never have a big enough hammer <G>
Cliff Coggin.
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Cliff Coggin wrote:

A cautionary tale of trying to be helpful to Silverline!
I tried to let Silverline know that the descriptions of a couple of their products in their catalogue (online and paper) were just plain wrong and that the item I had received also had problems that would be irrepairable to the end user and cause the units to fail after one or two uses and that the fault was an obvious design and/or quality control issue and given that the units were imported from China or India etc suspected that Silverline may be unaware of the very small but crucial defect.
Low and behold it failed the first time I tried to use it.
To say they were uninterested would be an understatement! Spoke to customer services and they were of the opinion that everything was ok and why didn't I just send it back to the dealer I had purchased it from for replacement. Took it further and further sand continued to meet a wall of corporate apathy all the way up the chain of command.
Eventually I ended up speaking to the head man, expecting at least a modicom of interest but basically he didn't give a toss either and I got the impression that I was, as far as he was concerned, a vexatious anorak trying to make trouble, rubbishing his company and wasting his time. The conversation then went downhill very quickly!
The item in question was a long necked gas torch with a trigger to switch from pilot to full flame. The trigger mechanism incorporated an M3 screw with a nylock nut. The idea being that this passed through the trigger and pulled a valve from the full flame into the pilot setting. Unfortunately the screw - part of the valve itself, wasn't long enough and the nylock only went on by one and a half turns. Unsurprisingly the brass thread on the end of the valve stripped after being actuated half a dozen times. It wasn't possible to do the nut up anymore and had no hope of it getting into the nylon bit of the nut :o(
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Cliff Coggin wrote:

It WAS the case in the "old days"; however I happen to know that Estwing's measure the whole hammer, including the handle.
I know this, because a carpenter friend was hurting his elbow using an Estwing (24Oz) in an overhead position (doing roofs).
So I got him a 20 Oz vintage hammer (presumed to be 4 Oz lighter, of course).
After a fortnight, when I saw him again, he said the vintage hammer was lovely, but surprisingly hard to swing.
So we headed for the kitchen scales, and discovered the facts :-)
BugBear
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