Variable Section Protrusion

Hi I use ProE Wildfire 2.0 (I suppose.. :-) ) I have to design a part with double-tapered piece (i.e. truncated cone) I would sketch the first section and the last one.
Otherwise suggest me how I can do.
I tryed to use the 'Variable Section Sweep'...I sketched the trajectory (a straight line) e I sketched the first section (a box). The result is not like I would.
Matteo
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You could also create this shape by sketching the two end circles, then creating a boundary surface between them, capping it off and solidifying.
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On Nov 5, 11:33 am, snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com wrote:

That is how I'd do it. But be sure to use control points. Don't let it develop more surfaces than necessary. Ideally the sections have the same number of segments, if so you can use piece to piece fit to help control your blend. Otherwise it may help to add a datum point or two to reference as control points. Try it and see.
If the blend is twisted, you can drag a start point to help straighten it out.
Then merge the quilts together, select the quilt and EDIT: SOLIDITY
Becoming handy with SBB is a major key to successful surface modeling. Most complex shapes utilize this.
If this is actually just a simple round cone, do a revolved protrusion.
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Or a parallel blend. Same number of entities per section.
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wrote:<BR>&gt; You could also create this shape by sketching the two end circles,<BR>&gt; then creating a boundary surface between them, capping it off and<BR>&gt; solidifying.<BR><BR><BR>That is how I'd do it. But be sure to use control points. Don't let it<BR>develop more surfaces than necessary. Ideally the sections have the<BR>same number of segments, if so you can use piece to piece fit to help<BR>control your blend. Otherwise it may help to add a datum point or two<BR>to reference as control points. Try it and see.<BR><BR>If the blend is twisted, you can drag a start point to help straighten<BR>it out.<BR><BR>Then merge the quilts together, select the quilt and EDIT: SOLIDITY<BR><BR>Becoming handy with SBB is a major key to successful surface modeling.<BR>Most complex shapes utilize this.<BR><BR><BR><BR>If this is actually just a simple round cone, do a revolved protrusion.<BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <DIV>Another approach, using the same SBB tools:</DIV> <DIV>"Fill" each end sketch</DIV> <DIV>Select capping surfaces</DIV> <DIV>Click on the boundary blend icon and it blends between the two surfaces.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>David Janes</DIV></BODY></HTML>
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