clueless

Hi - I now have a PIC16F84A microchip and wish to get started using serial port connection - I am clueless however when it comes to wiring this up. I
would initially simply like to get some LED's up and flashing and maybe learn how to receive data back from the PIC to the serial port. I have the 88 page Data sheet for this model and I have 2 PIC books by R.A Penfold - but nowhere can I see how to do a simple task such as led flash etc. Can anyone help out here? - I always need help with beginning new ventures and would appreciate a lift - cheers
James Jenkins
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the
First, you're going to need a programmer. I built Michael Covington's No Parts Pic Programmer (http://www.covingtoninnovations.com/noppp/index.html ) and it worked fine for me. (However I do want to buy or build a better one--any suggestions for less than $100Cdn?)
You'll need software to operate the programmer. You can get the software that works iwth NoPPP from the website.
You'll need a test circuit to use your chip in. This one looks good: http://www.interq.or.jp/japan/se-inoue/e_pic6_1.htm
He's got software for you, too. You'll have to read his instructions on how to use it.
If you're interested, here's the program I wrote for my test circuit: http://www.iosphere.net/~owen/electronics/interdig.htm
I had never done any of this before, and I got it all to work with just information from the internet. Be persistent and I'm confident you'll make it happen.
- Owen -
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Thanks for the info - can I use the MPLAB from microchip?
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I used MPLAB to develop my program. It produced the output I needed for the input to the NoPPP programmer software.

the port i/o address this way?
The asm has to be the same language as your PIC can understand, and your C++ compiler has to be able to produce the machine code your PIC can understand. You can't just use any old C++ compiler and expect it to work. Sorry, I haven't done this myself, so I'll step aside and let the others with the pertinent facts fill in the blanks. As another poster says, a C compiler like CCS can work.
- Owen -
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Hi again - in fact can I simply use C++ compiler (with Asm) and simply use the port i/o address this way?
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I don't know how much money you want to spend. But I think my setup is great for easily learning and implementing a serial port connection.
As mentioned before, a PIC programmer - I use the USB programmer from Olimex (www.sparkfun.com) One of the serial port development boards from Olimex (www.sparkfun.com). These come with a more capable PIC chip like the 16F873A or 16F877A and built-in RS232 level shifters. A C compiler - I use the CCS C Compiler.
Both the programmer and C compiler integrate with Microchip's free MPLAB development environment (www.microchip.com)
I was amazed at how simple it was to implement a serial port app with the CCS C compiler after having used assembly for awhile.
BRW
On Sat, 4 Sep 2004 12:07:16 +0100, "Tamar Solutions"

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James,
If you are comfortable with C, get the book "Programming Robot Controllers" by Myke Predko. He shows how to make a simple programmer that costs about $17. He then shows how to do many simple and not so simple things with a PIC such as flashing an LED, creating a PWM signal and using an LCD. Al the software used is free, however you will need to get either a PIC 16F84 (not A) or a 16F627. BTW Microchip will give you up to three sample chips per quarter just for asking.
Tamar Solutions wrote:

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