Go for it, Burt!

Godspeed SpaceShipOne!
All the best wishes from this side of the pond.
Chris

--
Chris Eilbeck mailto: snipped-for-privacy@yordas.demon.co.uk
MARS Flight Crew http://www.mars.org.uk /
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On 20 Jun 2004 20:57:14 +0100, Chris Eilbeck

What he said.
--
Darren J Longhorn http://www.geocities.com/darrenlonghorn /
NSRG #005 http://www.northstarrocketry.org.uk /
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wrote:

What they said from the bottomof the other pond, and group heretic!
MMB
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On 20 Jun 2004 20:57:14 +0100, Chris Eilbeck

Too True!!!
Go for it and get that record, then turn it around in 2 weeks and then get the X-prize.
Anybody know of a net broadcast that I can (we) pick up the flight?
-- Sean Level 1 RSO www.pigmasterrockets.com www.blackknights.org.uk www.ukra.org.uk
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Sean wrote:

Unfortunately not, however we have a gallery full of pictures if you'd care to browse them... http://www.rokits.org/gallery/x-prize /
M.
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This flight did not qualify for the X Prize as it did not carry the requisite three people or equivalent ballast.
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Amen to that! I really hope everything goes to plan for Scaled, and I've got a good feeling it will.
--
Richard H
UKRA#1172 L2 Cert
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Hello: could someone explain how Burts plane can go into low earth orbit, without having to achieve the escape velocity of the earth? When would the escape velocity take effect if he had wanted to go higher? thank you
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Clifton Womack wrote:

It didn't go into orbit, just went up to "space" altitude and back down. He would have needed more velocity to reach low earth orbit. (Compare the Redstone and Atlas flights, both launching similar Mercury capsules...)
-dave w
without having to achieve the escape velocity of the earth? When

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He didn't go -into- orbit.
Joel. phx

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Escape velocity is needed to move beyond Earth orbit; the Moon or Mars, for example. Orbital velocity is needed to achieve Earth Orbit. Space Ship One is not capable of either.
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Clifton W. wrote: << Hello: could someone explain how Burts plane can go into low earth orbit, without having to achieve the escape velocity of the earth? When would the escape velocity take effect if he had wanted to go higher? >>
Hi Clifton! Spaceship One didn't go into orbit, it merely went high enough to reach space. (Same with Alan Sheppard's first flight in Mercury.) To reach low orbit, they would have needed to go much faster, somewhere around 17,000 mph if I remember correctly. Escape velocity is even faster, and is the speed required to leave Earth orbit.
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Picture a porpoise or dolphin jumping out of water. Just enough speed to break free for an instant, but they fall back into their atmosphere (water). That's what space ship one accomplished. He made it to space, but was still being strongly influenced by gravity and it pulled him back down.
steve
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Dumb question time... but how would 'escape velocity' even apply to Spaceship One (which 'launched' from 50,000 ft)? I mean, I thought escape velocity was the initial velocity (ignoring drag) needed when taking off from the surface of the Earth, without any additional thrust after escape velocity is achieved. On the other hand, you could escape Earth's gravity as slowly as you like, as long as you can continue to apply just enough thrust to more than counteract gravity. Right?

orbit,
to
low
mph if

required
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Mick wrote: << Dumb question time... but how would 'escape velocity' even apply to Spaceship One (which 'launched' from 50,000 ft)? I mean, I thought escape velocity was the initial velocity (ignoring drag) needed when taking off from the surface of the Earth, without any additional thrust after escape velocity is achieved.>>
"Escape velocity" is the speed needed to escape Earth orbit (somewhere around 25,000 mph, if I remember correctly). Where and how you launch is irrelevant. Being dropped from a plane at 50,000 feet simply means that the rocket won't have to work as hard or burn as much fuel as it would from a standing start on the ground.
<<On the other hand, you could escape Earth's gravity as slowly as you like, as long as you can continue to apply just enough thrust to more than counteract gravity. Right? >>
Escape velocity is just a specific speed, like 65mph on the freeway. You can reach that speed slowly, accellerating gradually. Or you can reach it quickly, "pedal to the metal".
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can
quickly,
But... Let's say I am gaining altitude at a constant rate of 1000 mph (far less than the Earth's escape velocity), and continue to do so. Eventually, I will escape the Earth, the solar system, and the galaxy, won't I? And if not, how come?
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Mick wrote:

Sure. You will have to have some constant thrust to oppose the gravitational forces acting on you so as to maintain your constant velocity (relative, I guess, to the point you are heading to), but you would eventually get where you want to go.
--
Gary Bolles
NAR 82636
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Mick wrote:

You were right the first time. Escape velocity is the initial velocity needed to escape the earths gravitational field (from the surface) without any additional energy input.
http://www.physlink.com/Education/AskExperts/ae158.cfm
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Mick wrote: << But... Let's say I am gaining altitude at a constant rate of 1000 mph (far less than the Earth's escape velocity), and continue to do so. Eventually, I will escape the Earth, the solar system, and the galaxy, won't I? >>
Yes. Of course, to maintain a constant rate like that would require continual thrust, at least until you were far enough away in deep space.
If you simply accellerated to 1000mph, then turned off the engines, you would slow down as Earth's gravity pulls on your ship, and eventually you'd fall back to Earth. This is what happens with our sport rockets -- rapid accelleration to a high speed, followed by loss of thrust, slowing and eventually return.
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"escape velocity", 25,000 mph, is essentially the instantaneous velocity necessary form sea level to leave Earths gravity. Think muzzle velocity from a gun. Of course if you continue to travel at a slow but steady speed, you will leave Earth behind. But this requires thrust the whole time. Up until now, all of our launch vehicles have been high thrust for a short time, then coast the rest of the time.
Any one remember the original Salvage One movie where the ex-astronaut uses a Ferari to demonstrate how NASA went to the moon, then his concept for a lunar flight.
Orbital velocity, for low earth orbit (shuttle, ISS, MIR, etc, NOT geosynchronous satellites) is 17,000 mph. While a slow low thrust spacecraft may get there, it won't be able to STAY in LEO unless it is travelling at 17000 mph.
    Bob Kaplow    NAR # 18L    TRA # "Impeach the TRA BoD"         >>> To reply, remove the TRABoD! <<< Kaplow Klips & Baffle:    http://nira-rocketry.org/LeadingEdge/Phantom4000.pdf www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/ www.nira-rocketry.org www.nar.org
Save Model Rocketry from the HSA! http://www.space-rockets.com/congress.html
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