how would you attempt to interest members of "the digital generation" in model rocketry?

Hey gang,
Just thought I'd try a new thread...
I've been noticing that a great many people involved with model rockets
seem to be roughly 25 or older.
Any ideas on how we can interest the under 25 crowd?
Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com writes:

Wait until they have a license, a car, and a job so they can afford the toys. Years ago I looked at my old rocket launch logs from my first decade in the hobby. I flew as many rockets in year 8 as I did in 1-7. Why? Got my drivers license and a car.
--
Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L >>> To reply, there's no internet on Mars (yet)! <<<
Kaplow Klips & Baffle: http://nira-rocketry.org/Document/MayJun00.pdf
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I dont know, kinda hard because most under 25 arent into rocketry at all, they spent most money on girlfriends and other things. It was a struggle for me to get the toys and thats nothing compared to what most you guys use. You'd have to be really dedicated to a hobby to really do that, and there seems to be little interest in space related stuff today...
-- TAI FU

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Around here there are a lot of 'kids' involved in rocketry. You see em all over, some with parents, some with friends. Parents are a key though, if the parent's passion doesn't transfer to the children, they may still attract friends.
TARC introduced many kids to rocketry, I wonder how many stay around to continue on.
Now, get propellant off the 'explosives' list and teachers might be able to use rocketry as a tool in the classroom. Why are we so short of engineers and science grads? We have a smallminded government agency in the way. They are contrary to the betterment of the United States in science, math and engineering. They need to butt out and let a real science agency write the policy.
Kids are often interested and participating until they hit the ceiling imposed by that backward agency. They are a detriment to America.
Chuck
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Chuck Rudy asked:

Chuck,
You seem pretty sharp, why didn't you go into engineering?
Doug
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Doug Sams wrote:

When the time came in my life to make the most important decision of all, I made none. Which is still a decision. I ended up going to work as my father did, his favorite quote was "you don't need an education, look at me"......he did well for no education, but I should have ignored his advice. There is little I enjoy more than just being on a college campus.....I would have loved to have taught at one.
Parents can do so much.....good and bad.
Chuck
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On Sat, 22 Apr 2006 19:59:16 -0700, rhjuliano wrote:

Well...the "little kids" seem to still have a presence. A couple of weeks ago, while in Hobby Lobby; I ran into quite a few kids who were there with their parents. The local Cub Scout pack was holding a group launch the next day, and the kids and parents were in the store buying the rockets and motors. (Gee...I do hope they bought something "quick build"...lol). I spoke to a few of them, and handed out little cards I had made up for just such an occasion. (The cards had several rocket-related website links on them).
And, I also see that our local community college is having quite a few summer "classes" for kids: one being on model rocketry. (I wish those over 12 could enroll...lol)
These are two methods two reach out to the kids.
--

Greg Heilers
Registered Linux user #328317 - SlackWare 10.2 (2.6.13)
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My son got into it. Had a great time with the Estes rockets initially, then built an Aerotech Arreaux and a Binder Design Dragon Fly with which he did his Mid-Power cert, (in-club thing we did before NAR brought it about). Next he built his Level 1, PML 1/4 scale Patriot, flew it the first time, cracked the payload bay from it coming back around and hitting the main body from too short of a shock cord. Rebuilt the payload bay and had success on the second try with an I161 for his level 1 cert. In club thing once again 3 years ago. Was good to see NAR put together the Jr. Certs after I brought it up years ago.
The last 2 years, unfortunately his Patriot has been collecting dust since it can't compete with his skateboard(s). I mean a rocket can't do a nollie to a rail darkside, with a kick flip. :) Always amazes me how kids can still spend just as much money on their interests as we do. I really can't say much about his $40 bearings, $50 boards he goes through, and $40 wheels, and on and on. I've always supported my son and it's great to see his enthusiasm in what he does enjoy and I'm blessed with the fact that he's outside getting great exercise when so many are sitting inside playing computer games. I swear he does 100 ollies a day...that's jumps his skateboard into the air for the laymen :) He's still coming to LDRS with me in Amarillo and can't get enough of the big rockets. Now if I can just find the time to get the 4" casing and nozzle done and test it for my 8gr 12 second burn AN motor for Monday's Research day :)
-Booms

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When I taught the 4, 5, 6 grade rocketry club I used these 5 rules.
First: They want to see something go up in the air. Second: They want to take part in the thing going up in the air. Third: They want to make their own and see it go up in the air. Fourth: Don't spend too much time building, spend the time launching. Fifth: The things that go up also come down. Cuts building time if they can fly again. ( Introduce recovery)
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On 22 Apr 2006 19:59:16 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Depends on how much under 25 you are taliking about. People a little under 25 have very different intrestes that people in college than those in high school etc.
You need to be more granular than just going after those under 25.
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On 22 Apr 2006 19:59:16 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Also, you need to start ingoring Brad Guth & his pals.
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Phil Stein wrote:

Phil,
1.) Ignoring/kill-filing loons doesn't seem to work. Case in point: all of Science Fiction Fandom. (That one's bad enough that I'm writing a paper on it.) Those who just see the loons gabbling, and no one disagreeing, will start to assume that the loons have at least tacit approval. With only a few folks saying, "shut up, you loon," others no longer assume the loon has a favored position. Case in point: the Delaware robot groups, The South-Eastern contingents of the SCA, and the convention known as DragonCon.
2.) I figure that if I can keep a loon like Brad going, I'm learning the right things, when it comes to social engineering.
3.) I teach for a living. The idea of someone like Brad Guth infecting the minds of others is something that I have problems with.
Bob
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says...

As someone involved on the periphery of fandom, please do elaborate. I'm not looking for a debate, just genuinely interested in your comments, particularly relative to DragonCon (lame-o-con).
--
Tweak

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Tweak wrote:

Tweak,
Thank you for your interest. Basically, I noticed that a number of events in fandom (see below) could perhaps have been stopped, if people at the core of each group had said something to the effect of "shut up, you loon." So far, I've noticed what could be described as brag rights via contrasts, in relation to DragonCon (I haven't yet been to DragonCon, so I have to reserve judgement.) One of DragonCon's biggest boats, as seen in the litcols I've read so far, they seem to take great - and loud - pride i nthe fact that they have very few fan feuds, as compared to the seasonal feuds that other cons have (see below.) Mouskowitz mentioned - in passing - that the rocketry clubs had left fandom pre WWII. That passing written comment bugged me, so I started to pry...
stoppable events: -michelism -the x acts -degler traveling show -dianetics -year of the jackpot -breen controversey -trekkers _vs_ "standard fandom" -the near take over of certain cons by the fantasy crowd -TAFF war 1 -cyberpunk _vs_ new wave fantasy
...mind you, this is nowhere near the full list. I hope that some of these topics could help prove my point (as I point to build a thesis around it, maybe build it up to a dissertation.)
cons with fannish feuds: Balticon Disclave Arisia Boskone (and the collapse in '87) Baycon
I'll admit that I need to check out west coast fandom. (Perhaps I can get a grant that would pay for these...)
Bob
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On 22 Apr 2006 19:59:16 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Make good reliable LOW COST certified motors available.
Make more good wide open launch sites available, locally if possible.
Create more local rocket clubs for mutual fun and support.
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A manufacture's group in hobbies did a study in the 90s to show that you need to interest the 29-47 crowd or your hobbies will not do well.
CD
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Cranny Dane wrote:

CD,
1.) I'd have to ask, what does "do well" mean? 2.) One of the rules I learned as a special Education student, and teacher of same, is that you need to catch the interest of the young. If someone's interest (the usual phrase is "a preponderence of the student's attention") is captured on one major subject, and they act upon said subject, they will stay with that subject. Therefore, I am wondering how we can involved the young.
Bob
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Hi Robert.
Do well means supported by interested groups who will consume and purchase products, keeping the hobby alive.
The hobby trade association found (in the 90s) to maintain that, you need to interest the 29-47 crowd with those that have disposable income.
For example, most new R/C flyers I meet that join up the local club have never flown a airplane as a youth.
They became interested after they got spare time on their hands, and money to spend doing thing they thought was be cool.
A smaller cross section are interested in R/C planes to interest their children, and themselves at the same time.
Until the manufactures changed their product line-up in the 90s, the R/C hobby was mostly very older men, with very little membership in the 29-47 consuming group. The manufactures, going against the AMA ideas, changed the entire face of R/C in the last 10 years with ARFS and easy to start nitro engines,and it's a very thriving situation. The old school was saying if it ain't a box of sticks, it ain't no airplane. It reminded me of the CW situation in Amateur Radio. The old timers proved to be wrong. The flying fields are packed with men and some women in that age group now, and you actually have to wait at times to get flying time in. the hobby stores are packed with R/C goods to overflowing. Ten years ago, most the R/C shelves were very dusty in my town.
In the last 5 years electric flight has put R/C planes into just about anyones hands, and you can fly them in a soccer field and some in their backyards.
Cranny Dane
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Education.
Bring rocketry to the classroom and to your local youth groups. Over and over and over again.
Don't expect everyone in a class to "get into" the hobby or stay with it, but if you get 1 or 2 out of every few classes, it begins to add up.
I started a program with our local Boys & Girls club that began with beginners (7 week after school program). After two years a lot of the kids in the beginner classes were asking for more, so we have started an intermediate program. Between the beginner class they had and this new one, most of these kids had built a half dozen kits or more on their own. It works.
It's not "instant", nor even "fast", but it does work. If everyone on this news group did a few classes a year I am convinced that the growth rate would be noticable.
jim
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