Airbrushes-do I have to engineer my own?

Just received the Omni 5000G that I thought was going to be my Holy Grail.
T'was not to be. Unlike my Paasche VL, the Omni has a cutaway in the handle to
give access to the needle knob, but this seems a rather superfluous feature.
In the picture on the Dixie Art webpage it shows this clearly, but I was under
the impression this was to gain access for fluid adjustment without the need to
remove the handle. Now I find it's merely to enable you to pull the needle
back for cleaning. Who cares? When it's time to clean the thing, I take it
apart anyway. I feel access for adjustments would make a lot more sense. It
seems more than a little backward to have to take it apart to adjust it, but
you can clean it when it's all together....what am I missing?
When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your
eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to
return. --Leonardo Da Vinci
EAA # 729686
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Reply to
Disco -- FlyNavy
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Setting the needle IS for fluid flow adjustment. The needle position determines the minimum flow when you depresses the lever. You can set the position all the way down to zero flow if you like. With the dual action airbrush pulling the lever back then increases the flow. Loosening the needle is also how you remove it for cleaning. And you're right, the cut away is so you can access the knob without removing the handle. Not a big deal but it does let you make faster adjustments when you are in the middle of a job. When I use to use a Badger 150 I would often leave the handle off so I would have easier access for needle adjustment.
Jim Bright
Reply to
jhbright
determines the minimum flow when you depresses the lever. You can set the position all the way down to zero flow if you like. With the dual action airbrush pulling the lever back then increases the flow>>
I realize that, but there are two knobs inside the handle, the forward one is for fluid flow adjustment, the rearward one is merely to clamp the needle into the chuck, which is the only one accessible through the cutaway. The fluid flow adjustment knob is obcured by the barrel when the airbrush is assembled.
When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return. --Leonardo Da Vinci EAA # 729686 delete .mil.nav to email
Reply to
Disco -- FlyNavy
I didn't realize you had a second knob just for fluid flow adjustment. You're right about that design -- looks like they weren't all on the same page when they did that one.
Jim Bright
Reply to
jhbright
You pull the needle out from the front. That's why they exposed the needle chucking nut. You never have to take the rear handle off.
David Kennesaw, GA
Reply to
jdb
??? I don't follow you there. Why would you want to do that ? What do you mean by "fluid adjustment", exactly ?
Reply to
Serge D. Grun
stick to the VL till you learn to paint...you're still a rookie. Mike IPMS
Reply to
Mike Keown

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