Bending etched parts accurately

OK...so getting on nicely with my 1/72 F4U-1D and no major disasters so far considering this is my first model in this scale. Now I have some etched
parts that need to be bent 90 degrees and the things are tiny so not sure how to achieve this.
I have a limited budget so what are the best ways to bend these accurately without spending loads of money on a new tool?
Thanks, Mark.
p.s. This model building thing must be getting addictive cause I have another 5 kits to do once I finish this one :-)
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I have been using medical forceps and/or some small, quality pliers. The forceps will securly hold very thin items and can be locked closed. Fairly hard to lose the part this way. They are also handy for flattening parts that have become bent or twisted. Curt

far
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The best tool for this is called the Etchmate, and is sold by Mission Models. It will last a lifetime.
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Hi Mark,
Here are a couple of inexpensive PE benders I've used before making my own 'Hold & Fold'/'Etchmate' like bender.
http://home.interlog.com/~khartlen/workshop/tools.htm (near the bottom)
Ken
--
Ken Hartlen (aka. Coaster)
khartlen[SNIP_THIS_BIT]@interlog.com
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pmfji, but do you know who made the old honda 305 superhawk model? my cb77 is my faveorite multi cylinder bike.
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The model of the 305 Honda Superhawk was made by Revell. Sam

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anybody out there have one?
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Ken, thanks for the Link, who wants to spend $65 USD to bend PE??
Cheers, Stephen

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Ken Hartlen wrote:

I can personally vouch as to the effectiveness of Ken's tools. i saw the PE tool, went out and bought the hinge, wing nuts, and bolts, and I liked it. Easy to use, simple construction, durable, easy to use, and INEXPENSIVE.
I've toyed with the idea of getting a Hold N' Fold or an Etch-Mate, but I haven't necessarily found a need to do that yet, using the homemade tools Ken put on his website.
Ken, I don't know you from Adam sans a few newsgroups posts, but thanks for the ingenuity. Has saved me a bundle so far.
--
Steve Frost
sofrostatmindspringdotcom
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that is so slick and so simple. I'm off to Office Depot and Home Depot to get me some cheap metal benders. Jerry 47

own
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Hi Steve,

Glad to hear someone else also finds them useful.
A couple other things. For a better grip, you might want to glue some 1000 or 1500 grit sand paper to the lower clamping surface. This should virtually eliminate any chance of the PE moving while bending. Especially with the ACCO clamp bender since you can't adjust the amount of pressure on the PE.
And also for the hinge. If the carriage bolts are too loose in the holes want to turn, maybe just epoxy them into the lower plate.
Ken
--
Ken Hartlen (aka. Coaster)
khartlen[SNIP_THIS_BIT]@interlog.com
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first one is free kid, but after that you have to pay.
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simplest way to bend etch (cheapest) is to use 2x straight razor blades. Hold with one and lift up the part with the other.
Spending slightly more, get a flat jawed pair of jewlery pliers. Try the Art/Craft supply store.
But, having said that, I love my Etchmate and long bending blades. Best $70 I spent for working w etch.
Mike please remove "diespam" to reply
If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs, perhaps you've misunderstood the situation.
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Mark Warrington wrote:

I use the "two razor blade" method. Cut the part free, and then on a hard flat surface, hold one side of the bend flat to th surface with either a single edged razor blade or the dull side of your X-Acto along the line of the fold.
Then take a(nother) single edged razor blade and silp it beneath the free side and lift into the 90 degree position against the guide formed by the edge of other blade.
Presto - you bend is made; no new expensive tools involved.
--
- Rufus


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I use either a hold & fold for large parts, parallel jaw pliers or flat tipped tweezers for tiny parts. Curves are done on dowels or drill shanks. I've had some ship and armor PE that is either too large or too thick for the razor blade method, thus the hold & fold.
Rufus wrote:

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Thanks to everybody for their help and advice. I was aware of the etchmate but it seems quite expensive - I'd rather save that money towards a decent airbrush.
I'll give the razorblades a go :-)
Thanks, Mark.

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On the home made front I use a set of steel angle iron jaws for my vice that have a nice flat edge on them and are 12 inches long. Held in the 4" wide vice jaws they hold anything easily and allow me to get a straight bend.
I've only bent things that are up to 3" wide but they should work happily for thick brass or thin stainless sheet up to the full width.
A suitable piece of scrap metal can be used as a drift to spead a hammer blow without leaving the hammer dent.
Hope this helps, Peter
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http://www.thesmallshop.com/ is the home of the Hold and Fold, a great small tool for those niggly little photoetch folds, or pieces up to many inches in width. Take a look.
Got mine a couple of years ago, and many car models are very happy I did.
--
Charles Fox
snipped-for-privacy@gte.net
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