Fleet Air Arm camouflage

During the 1950's and 60's the FAA camouflage was either Extra Dark Sea
Grey uppers with Sky or white undersides. My query is about the Sea
Vixen in particular but would apply to other aircraft such as the Sea
Venom and Attacker as well. Some of the kit instructions for aircraft
of this period suggest that the topsides (i.e Extra Dark Sea Grey) were
matt and the undersides (Sky or white) were gloss, and most of the
buildups and kit reviews on various sites suggest that the final finish
was gloss overall; at least they finish the entire model with a final
coat of Future or gloss spray. I have googled the internet using
various combinations of words and found plenty of references to FAA
camouflage but not one reference regarding whether the finish (according
to specs.) was matt + gloss, all gloss or all matt. I realise that
after a few weeks at sea the aircraft would probably have been more or
less matt all over due to the climate, but what was the official
finish. Help would be appreciated as my Sea Vixen is painted up,
decalled and ready for the finishing final coat. Thanks,
Derek Shaw
Reply to
Derek Shaw
Loading thread data ...
Hi Derek, I have been told by various Fleet Air Arm Vets that aircraft in RN and RAN were often maintained by rubbing down with an oily cloth, this was to prevent corrosion etc, ( someone may correct me here but sounds logical to me). This I would assume would at least give the aircraft a semi-gloss appearance at least. When I look at pictures of RN and RAN aircraft they usually look quite well maintained appearance wise compared to US Navy aircraft which usually show more wear and tear. I am assuming this is because of the rub down they received I would go for a semi-gloss as this would look better scale wise, hope this helps . Regards JimboD
Reply to
JDorsett
When I was undergoing trade training in the early 80s at RAF Cosford, we used to do our weapon load training on Sea Vixens. They were always glossy and well presented. One would have thought that this was because they were at a training unit and so they were reasonably well looked after, but it was not so. There were a number of aircraft in use as instructional airframes, including Hunters, Gnats and Shackletons. None of them were looked after properly and all the ex-RAF aircraft got very tatty indeed. The ex-FAA Sea Vixens remained nice and glossy with no work at all. I believe this was probably due to the quality of the paint finish, which was intended to provide corrosion protection on an exposed carrier flightdeck.
Reply to
Enzo Matrix
Vixens were EDSG/White in a gloss finish overall
Remove nospam to reply!!
Reply to
Dave Fleming
Thanks for the advice, I finished the model in a satin finish and it looks just about right. Derek Shaw
Derek Shaw wrote:
Reply to
Derek Shaw
I'd like to know when this scheme was withdrawn from service and which aircraft was last to wear it. I'm guessing it was a Harrier in about 1981...?
Nick
Reply to
Nick Pedley
Yeah that's about right I think. Buccaneers went from Grey over White to overall Grey in the late 60s. RN Phantoms had a Grey over White scheme but were flat in comparison to the early Sea Harriers.
Reply to
jwadetjpp
Thanks for that, it matches with the stories and pics of the Harriers being repainted aboard ship en-route to the Falklands. Those on HMS Hermes were painted by hand and those on HMS Invincible were painted with an airbrush, all because the newer ship had an airconditioned hangar deck.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Pedley

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.