Douglas Skynight

Does anyone know the colour for the wheel wells and the inside faces of the
undercarriage doors for the Douglas Skynight? Similarly, what colour was
the cockpit canopy framing? It looks as if part of it, at least, might have
been white or pale grey.
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin
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If you're working on a grey and white example the wheelwells probably should be white and the canopy framing is Gull Grey Gloss. I'm not sure about matt black or Gloss Sea Blue models' wheelwells.
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
Thanks for the reply.
I should have mentioned that the model is in Gloss Sea Blue. I'd forgotten that the colours changed whilst the Skyknight was still in service. I also notice now that I mis-spelled Skyknight in my original posting. At one time, I could rely on my spelling without question. These days, I have to think about it.
Incidentally, I've often noticed the letters MFE Sr. after your signature. Is it a qualification?
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin
I think the bays on the blue examples were painted the same color as the exterior. I'm not sure about the inside framing of the glazing but would expect it to be flat black like most of the cockpit was.
Reply to
Bill Woodier
Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin
Thanks for the reply.
First, the blank post was sent by mistake. I double clicked on something.
Second, it was actually the exterior framing of the canopy that I had in mind. On pictures of black and Sea Blue aircraft, part of the framing is in the dark exterior colour but the rest is in some much lighter colour. It's hard to tell if it's white, pale grey or even aluminium but it seems to be on all of them.
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin
Sorry for the misunderstanding. I don't think I can help with that one.
Reply to
Bill Woodier
Yes, me too, and I was once the spelling champ of my grade school. All these years and I've missed seeing the 'k'. I thought the 'night' referred to its role.
It qualifies me to expound on how things were way back then. :) The Sr. has a sad story to tell. The other week I was seeking something at the grocery store. A young lady asked in that condescending way they use with old people, "Can I help you find something, hon?" I was flabbergasted and it took me a couple of seconds to realise she was addressing me. Me, the tall kid? I'm more used to responding respectfully to little old ladies who need something on the top shelf. There wasn't anyone else in the aisle and she didn't have a pocket phone applied to her ear so it had to be me. Apparently now I look non-threatening to young women. (Sigh)
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
Unfortunately, I know exactly how you feel. It's not a new feeling. About thirteen years ago when I was still in my early forties, one of my students interrupted me in mid-sentence to ask me if I used a particular brand of hair dye. I said that I didn't. She replied, "It's funny that 'cause you're pretty old but you've got no grey hairs.".
I must seem positively antediluvian to them now.
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin
Gordon,
Wasn't she the cheeky one? Take comfort in the fact that one of my aunts didn't start greying until she was well into her 80s. I, on the other hand, started in my 20s. ;]
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad Modeller
It's probably the edging of the glazing showing up. Most people think that there's a layer of something added to the glazing, but it's not, really. Most of the time it's the inside of the canopy surface (which is usually painted black or whatever on its outer surface) showing through the thickness of the canopy. I've seen them from a pale yellow, through a green that is very similar to raw fiberglass, to light tan. Steve
Gord>
Reply to
Steve Collins

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