OT - Steam-Driven Plane

Would make a interesting subject for a resin kit - http://blog.modernmechanix.com/2007/11/03/worlds-first-steam-driven-airplane /
The Germans were working on the concept of a steam-driven heavy bomber at the end of WWII.
Pat
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There were a number of plans to build steam planes, especially steam turbine ones. One steam plane did fly- a Great Lakes biplane, with engine installation by Besler or Basler brothers, but it was only to show it could be done.
However, in the thirties there were a number of designs drawn up for large steam aircraft, though to my knowledge none ever flew. I forget who was doing this in US- maybe it was Northrup- I'll look and see if I can find it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Stauffer in Minnesota wrote:

That's the one in the article.
Pat
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

see if the Japanese movie "Steamboy" gives you any ideas if you want to create your own...
Craig
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Back around 1890 Clement Ader was able to coax his bat winged, carriage like steam powered Eole into a couple of short hops. Nothing lke sustained, controlled flight, but it was certainly among the most bizare looking of the early flying machines.
It was kitted by Brifaut n 1/70 scale. The injection molded were covered in a blue silk smilar to the Renwal/Taimei "Aero Skin" series. The model was so complex and fragile that each box contained two sets of parts.
Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Okay, found my book. The large steam flying boat design I was referrring to was by Great Lakes.! This not the little biplane of the demo, but a really large plane with a 2300 hp steam turbine. The biplane used a steam recip. The Great Lakes flying boat had the boiler and condenser in the hull, while the turbine was in the high wing (wing on struts so the very large propeller would clear the fuselage. The system used steam at 540 degrees C, 70 atm.
A British firm called Aero Turbines, showed a demo turbine in 1938, and a German firm Huttner, had a similar design.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.