PE question

I have been back into scale modelling for a couple of years now, and was
thinking about trying out one of the photoetch detail sets. I was wondering
if anyboby had some opinions about where to start. I have never even looked
at one so I know almost nothing about them.
I work almost exclusively in 1/72 scale propeller aircraft (I may move into
jets someday, but not yet.)
Roman
Reply to
Roman & Wendy
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It depends a lot on which 1/72 prop aircraft you want to build. IMO, the stuff that needs PE the worst are the older kits (like Airfix and Frog) that have bare cockpits. Some of these kits are covered by specific aftermarket PE sets, but for some, you'd need generic materials, like the various Reheat seatbelts, panels, etc.
If, OTOH, you are building, something like the new 1/72 Academy P-38, you'd only want to use PE if there were omitted or out-of-scale details (not many of either on this kit) or if you just really want to dress it up as much as you can. That's more of an esthetic question than a practical one, but I really have little need to substutite lots of resin and PE for a cockpit that is already very good in the box. so I wouldn't bother.
Mark Schynert
Reply to
Mark Schynert
Depends on what you are building - I started with etched belt buckles and thing got (way...) out of hand for me from there. Etched buckles (like the Waldron line) and masking tape make great looking seat straps.
If you're thinking of doing a jet, I'd suggest that a jet may offer you a better introduction - the etched parts for a jet may not be as tiny or numerours as for a WWII subject. Though I wouldn't suggest you not try something like a P-51 or such.
Eduard covers the largest variety of subjects, and I think are easisest for most folks to get. I usually find mine at Squadron - you can look there, or on the Eduard site. I like the fit and overall quality of Eduard etched parts. And brass etch is easiest to work with.
Reply to
Rufus
I would advise buying a good quality kit with good detail and adding an Eduard colour etch set .They are pre-painted as the name suggests and would allow you to get a feel for photo etch before diving into anything more complex .
Reply to
Darryl Dyke
Thank you all for the responses. I am mostlry looking for something just to try out the whole idea of PE parts. It is less a case of wanting (or needing) the detail as it is wanting to experiment with PE parts sets. I am giving serious thought to the Eduard sets fo the Italeri razorback P-51 as I have built the kit several times. Is there anything in the way of special tools or equipment that is reccommended for these things?
Roman
Reply to
Roman & Wendy
In that case, there are all sorts of photo-etch sets that aren't specific to a particular model. Such as, but not limited to 1) barbed-wire for fences 2) toolboxes and other stowage bits 3) seat-belts 4) individual leaves for trees
I'm sure there are plenty of similar sets for airplanes too if airplanes are your only gig.
CA glue. Files. Magnifying glasses. Vacuums and panty-hose. Optional, expensive and useful ... Hold n Fold or Etch Mate.
Reply to
John McGrail
A single edge razor blade and a metal straight edge are about all you'll need. A stamp tweezer might also come in handy. FWIW Eduard's Zoom line has fewer parts per kit and serve as a great introduction to photoetch. hth
The Keeper (of too much crap!)
Reply to
Keeper
LOL The nylons are for putting over the end of the vacuum cleaner hose. When you drop a part into the "carpet monster," you can use the vacuum to suck up the bit that got away without it being swallowed by the machine.
Don McIntyre Clarksville, TN
Reply to
Don McIntyre
When you lose parts to the floor you wrap panty hose over the vacuum hose and go hunting; the part usually winds up captured on the panty hose. hth
The Keeper (of too much crap!)
Reply to
Keeper

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