Scouts

My partners youngest son has just moved up into the local Scout Group (tribe!!!) and as asked me for a kit that the whole tribe can build to get
some sort of badge. The only kit I can think of to give them is the old Monogram 1/48 B29. This should be a fun build if they let me play as well (purely in an advisory capacity, yoo understand!)
Rory Manton
It's Not Pink It's Telemagenta
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Go for it! My scouts did a Waterloo tabletop battle re-enactment with hundreds of tiny models they'd mostly painted themselves. Great way to learn history! Some others built kits they'd got for Christmas and we gave them the Hobby badge.
Nick
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Sorry my friend, but model kits are not allowed when trying for the Boy Scout Merit Badge called, "Model Design and Building." In fact, kits are specifically excluded. Here are the official requirements for Scouts to earn the Merit Badge....
Terry Sumner, Former Scoutmaster (twice!)
Study and understand the requirements for personal safety when using such modelmaker hand tools such as: knives, handsaws, vices, files, hammers, screwdrivers, hand drills and drill bits, pliers, and portable power tools, and when to use protective equipment such as goggles when grinding or drilling. Know what precautions to take when using flammable or hazardous products such as: glue, epoxy, paint, thinners. Discuss these with your counselor before you begin your model-making project and tell why they are important.
Explain the uses for each of the following types of models: architectural, structural, process, mechanical, and industrial. Do research into the different types of materials that could be used in making these models. With your counselor's advice, select a subject from requirement 4 for your model project (no kits). Prepare the necessary plans to the proper scale, a list of materials to be used, and a list of the required tools. This model should be your own original work. Tell why you selected this subject.
Do ONE of the following:
Make an architectural model. Build a model of a house to a scale of 1/4"=1'0" (50:1 metric). Discuss with your counselor the materials you intend to use, the amount of detail required, outside treatment (finish, shrubbery, walks, etc.) and color selections. After completing the model, present it to your counselor for approval.
Build a structural model. Construct a model showing corner construction of a wood frame building to a scale of 1 1/2"=1'0" (8:1 Metric). All structures shown must be to scale. Cardboard or flat sheet wood stock may be used for sheeting or flooring on the model. Review with your counselor the problems you encountered in gathering the materials and supporting the structure. Be able to name the parts of the floor and wall frames, such as intermediate girder, joist, bridging, subfloor, sill, sole plate, stud and rafter.
Make a process model. Build a model showing the plumbing system in your house. Show hot and cold water supply, all waste returns, and venting to a scale of 3/4"=1'0" (15:1 Metric). Talk to your counselor about how to begin this model, and present the scale and the materials you will use. After completion, present the model to your counselor and be prepared to discuss any problems you had building this model.
Complete a mechanical model. Build a model of a mechanical device that uses at least two of the six simple machines. After completing the the model, present it to your counselor. Be prepared to discuss materials used, the machine's function, and any particular difficulty you may have encountered.
Make an industrial model. Build a model of an actual passenger-carrying vehicle to a scale of 1"=1'0" or " = 1'0" (10:1 or 25:1 Metric). Take the dimensions of the vehicle, and record the important dimensions. Draw the top, front, rear, and sides of the vehicle to scale. From your plans, build a model of the vehicle to scale. From your plans, build a model of the vehicle and finish in a craftsmanlike manner. Discuss with your counselor the most difficult part of completing the model.
Build a special-effects model of a fantasy spacecraft that might appear in a Hollywood science-fiction movie. Determine an appropriate scale for your design - one that makes practical sense. Include a cockpit or control area, living space, storage unit, engineering spaces, and propulsion systems.
As you plan and build your model, do the following Study aircraft, submarines, and naval ships for design ideas. Arrange and assemble the parts. Sketch your completed model. Write a short essay in which you discuss your design, scale, and materials choices. Describe how you engineered your model and discuss any difficulties you encountered and what you learned. List at least six occupations in which modelmaking is used and discuss with your counselor some career opportunities in this field.
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get
Which country are you talking about? I'm guessing you are in the USA... The requirements differ for all the different badges in all 160 countries Scouting happens in. Rory and I happen to be in the UK where completion of a kit to an acceptable standard can earn a badge for those involved. It is best if the judging is assessed by someone in the know, preferably someone who builds models and understands the skills needed in relation to a childs ability.
http://www.scoutbase.org.uk/library/hqdocs/badges/index.htm
In the UK... Cubs can get the Hobbies badge by showing an ongoing interest in model building.
Scouts can build models for; Hobbies badge (but preferably not if they did it for their Cub badge), as one part of one of the three Aviation Skills badges (Basic, normal and Advanced), possibly as one part of one of the three Nautical badges, Model Maker badge (option E) requirements below;
To a standard agreed with the assessor, complete one of the following two activities: Build and fully finish a model involving the use of a plastic or white metal kit or pre-cast figures. Design and construct a model from wood, plastic or metal construction set (such as Lego or Meccano). Discuss with the assessor the difficulties encountered whilst building the model and the advantages and the disadvantages of using the material chosen. Demonstrate a knowledge of the different types of kits or parts available in the material they chose.
Explorer Scouts (14-18 age range) can do model making for the Creative badge by demonstrating to the examiner continued involvement in a creative activity for at least 50 hours. Evidence should be in a variety of forms, for example, writing, pictures, photographs, videos, and should show improvement. They must display their work to a public audience.
All these can also build a model of a hill showing contour lines to demonstrate their understanding of how the lines on a map relate to a land feature. This is not really for any badge but is good for teaching map reading, is a craft evening activity and gives them an idea of how to do a diorama base!
Nick
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