Pledge vs Future and preservation techniques for built kits.

Good Day Friends!
I have been reading a few posts concerning Future from Johnson & Johnson
(sp?) aka, I believe as Johnson's wax, where the product is used to add a
sleek finished look esp. to the clear plastic on models. Wife came home
with some "Pledge" furniture polish, more correctly, a packet of "paper
towelets" treated (lightly) with Orange Oil Pledge.... I was concerned that
the Orange Oils present in the product might damage (especially clear)
plastic parts. OTOH, it might make for a nice "sheen" however I am
suspicious that those oils that look so nice, might in fact, act as a dust
magnet. Just what I need.
This wouldn't be much of a big deal, but, I am not allowed to drive (due to
heart meds) and going to wal-mart is a special effort for me and I don't
always get exactly what I need, due to the "closest thing they had like what
you asked for" thing that happens when I don't take care of those kinds of
details myself. Alas, I digress... the other reason I thought it important
enough to post to the group, was that I have several ('50's vintage) plastic
model cars that have been built, and some are painted. I don't want to
spoil the paint/finish, and although the cars have been stored in (in some
cases) the original boxes, they are in need of a general cleanup. I know
certain antiques lose value when they are refinished, rather like having
grandpa's shotgun re-blued (yikes) I don't want to foul up one of the
models. It's not an issue of money, or value. Actually I had not even
considered selling the kits that are built. This is all about preservation
and presentation. I'd appreciate very much any ideas or suggestions. I
would be pleased to answer any questions that might make offering a solution
easier.
Thanks for taking the time to read,
Bruce Apple
Reply to
Bruce W. Apple MA, NCC
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snippage:
Bruce:
Future = O.K.
Pledge = No-No!
Future is a liquid acrylic finish. you apply a thin coat and it dries VERY hard and smooth. Has some leveling effect on paint layers and gives a very smooth finish for decal adhesion.
Pledge is a combination of oils that is designed to clean wood finishes of collected dust and whatever effluent they may have acquired from the air (settled cigarette smoke, cooking oils, etc.) and would probably not do a model finish a bit of good. Cleaning: Depending on what kind of finish you have there are a couple of approaches. If the finish is lacquer or enamel and any decals have a clear lacquer or enamel overcoat, you can do a pretty good cleanup with windex and water. Windex will not be so good on acrylic finishes. I have used a common dishwashing detergent in water for this. Don't soak the surface, but an old undershirt wetted with the stuff will do a nice job. Be sure you use a plain detergent, not one of the ones with hand lotion added for keeping Milady's hands soft, that will leave a film on the surface.
Bill Shuey
Reply to
William H. Shuey
Don't do it! It's basically mineral spirits with a fragrance added.
"Bruce W. Apple MA, NCC" wrote: > > Good Day Friends! > > I have been reading a few posts concerning Future from Johnson & Johnson > (sp?) aka, I believe as Johnson's wax, where the product is used to add a > sleek finished look esp. to the clear plastic on models. Wife came home > with some "Pledge" furniture polish, more correctly, a packet of "paper > towelets" treated (lightly) with Orange Oil Pledge.... I was concerned that > the Orange Oils present in the product might damage (especially clear)
Reply to
Ron
Thanks guys, It's obvious that I was about to commit a gross tactical err. Time and responses appreciated. Future it is, nix the pledge. Happy Thanksgiving to RMS and Your Families, Bruce Apple
Reply to
Bruce W. Apple MA, NCC
Hi Bruce -
If the dirt or dust on your older models has built up, I've gotten good results by simply holding the model under a gentle stream of tap water while using a soft paintbrush to loosen the dirt. A 1" brush from one of those inexpensive grocery-store multi-packs is fine.
Interiors can be blown out with a compressed-air spray can, or dusted with a soft brush (dry).
Just dry off all the water so it doesn't leave spots.
Regards,
David
Reply to
BomberODavid

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