Tamiya paint "not brushing on well"

I have been having a problem when I am brushing on Tamiya Acrylics. I mix the paint well and when I brush it on, it doesn't coat well its like it doesn't stick. I like the Tamiya paints to air brush, I have no poblems there. If there is a solution or a work around please let me know. Is there better paint out there for brushing? Thank you to all in advance.

Reply to
crimsonghost64
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I'm no expert but I've seen this sort of comment posted many times and I have had similar experiences.

Seems that Tamiya acrylics spray very well but don't take to brush painting.

If it is not sticking it may well be that the surface hasn't been cleaned of grease.

However, from my experience it is quite difficult to put down and even coat. It starts to dry quickly and any overpainting disrupts the paint underneath (similar problems when trying to add 2nd coat).

Cheers,

Nigel

Reply to
Nigel Heather

Its always on bare plastic when it happens, its like the paint won't stick. it runs and streaks. It refuses to go on smooth.

Reply to
crimsonghost64

PaPaPeng wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:

I've had the same problems and that was on VERY grease free surface. Some one here in the group told me about the extender. I bought it and..... problem solved BIG TIME.

Reply to
Bert-Jan

Brush Painting on bare plastic with acrylics is not a good thing to do. Actually you should alwaays prime the surface but acrylics really need this.

Try using a primer like Mr Surfacer 1200 in the spray can. Then use an acrylic retarder. Oh and keep the brush wet. If it begins to dry out it will drag the paint again true of any paint. I wet my brush in water or thinner every two strokes or so and then run it across a rag so its moist.

Also unlike Polyscale, Lifecolor etc. You must give Tamiya a bit longer to dry, this is true with GunzeSanyo paints too.

I preffer to airbrush Tamiya and brush paint with Valejo Model Colour paints.

Reply to
fokkereiv

How are the Valejo paints? I have heard that they are really nice to use, but no one in my area seems to sell them.

Reply to
crimsonghost64

Vallejo Model color are great for brush painting, but dont use straight from the squeeze bottle. Theey are intended to be thinned. One thing that is not good is the surface can be fragile. But the cost compared to otheer paints and the range of colours are scond to non. I dont airbrush them though. Only brush paint. A lot of figure builders use them with varying leveels of thinning to get all sorts of effects.

Reply to
fokkereiv

Where can I get my hands on some. I'm in Northern Calif. and no one seems to carry Vallejo paints or has heard of them. Is there a good online source for them?

Reply to
crimsonghost64

You can get them from Squadron.com -- but I paint all my models with brush and I use Modelmaster Acryl and/or Polyscale right out of the jar. These are the best brushing paints I've ever used. Even beat the old Humbrol enamels!

I can't recommend Tamiya, Gunze or Vallejo.

Tamiya is difficult to brush. Surface "dry" in seconds but the alcohol solvent smells bad and can "lift" the first coat.

Gunze is better than Tamiya, but I don't like the smell.

Vallejo paints are "okay" but too thick (require thinning) and the packaging is inconvenient (squeeze bottle? huh?). No better/worse than MM or Polyscale when thinned properly--but the hassle of the squeeze bottle is a big problem. Can't see in it, difficult to stir...

Here's how to brush Polyscale/MM Acryl

Apply multiple, thin coats. Don't expect it to cover on the first try. Apply a good healthy coat with a good brush of appropriate size. I use red sable brushes sized 0, 1, or 2. It will look like hell after the first coat, but the second and third coats will dry smooth and opaque. Let each coat dry for a couple of hours--more if you can wait. I usually work on two kits at once so that I can set one aside and let it dry overnight if needed.

Reply to
dancho

lol at the risk of starting a paint war. The problems you quote with Vallejo are in fact its strenghs, its original intent was in figure painting where you start with a colour and then apply washes of lighter and darker shades for the shadows and highlights. Therefore its not intended to be used straight ever. For solid colour its a 1 to

1 or 1 to 2 parts paint to water. For washes its 1 to 6 or even 12 parts water. Works great most figure painters who use acrylics either use Vallejo or Andrea which are very similiar. The squeeze bottle means the paint doesnt go off or dry out as fast. As to economics 1 Vallejo squeese bottle = 3 tins or jars of Pollyscale MM Acryl etc. So its way more cost eficient and the range of colours is probably greater. I loved Pollyscale but sorry I hate acryl and quite honestly I'm still miffed that they replaced Pollyscale with Acryl its to much of a paint to suit all tastes and therefore doesnt quite suite any to me.

Your right about Tamiya, its not really intended for brush painting.

However with any brand of paint, the key to getting a good finish is to not rebrush where you have already brushed and having a moist and clean brush. As in dip it in thinners every few brush strokes especially on recoats. Otherwise it tends to lift previous coats or worse leave brush stroke marks.

Ray

Reply to
fokkereiv

Hello there.

Here is what my hobby dealer told me after I spent $100 on Tamiya acrylics that I found out I either a) could not brush on or b) that lifted when I tried apllying a second coat: "Tamiya acrylics are designed for air-brushing and cant be brushed on large surfaces." ie 1/48 aircraft or 1/35 armour.

This dealer also refused to take back the unopened paints which were all but two of the jars I bought.

I no longer deal with that shop.

I now only use acrylics such as Folk Art, Crafter's Choce, Delta Cream Coat etcetera. Many of these can be purchased for $1.00 to $1.50 per two ounce bottle.

Cheers from Peter

Reply to
TankBuilder2

About the Folk art paint.....my wife uses it for her minitures and general kind of stuff. Will that work on plastic models? I have never tried them. Peter...that's #@$^&^ up'ed, it seems to be true about the Tamiya paint. I do tend to do those scales of models too. I wasn't even trying to cover a big area, just a exhaust pipe on a Panther. I'm really getting jack of it. There are so many paints out there now. I know when I started modeling.....it was Testors paint....oil base...good times!

Reply to
crimsonghost64

No wonder - Vallejo is the producer, Andrea is juste a brand. Prince August and Aircraft Colors/Colour of Eagles are some of the other brands of the same maker.

Reply to
Serge D. Grun

I have been doing this (painting) for a while (decades?) so I know that most of the battle is in the details. Those little, teeny details that add up to a "good job" or a trip to the wastebasket (!). How thin is "right?" Only experience tells. Can I apply a second coat now? Experience. What kind of brush/size of brush? Experience again.

Vallejo is good paint--I'm sure it's wonderful IF you want to bother with the mixing. I have some Vallejo paints. I mix them on a palette with some liquid retarder and the result is good. But the convenience of the bottled paint is so great. I used to mix all the colors I used--not now. I live in a time and place where hobby supplies are easy to get. Why not take advantage?

Spray painting allows you to beat the problem to death with technology. Nothin' wrong with that! But to learn to paint without an airbrush, you have to not be afraid to make mistakes in order to learn. I don't know where I heard this (sure wish I could remember).."Painting (with a brush) is like shooting. Aim. Hold your breath... and PAINT!"

Reply to
dancho

Agreed on the conveniance. Vallejo when used for figures has to be mixed pretty much as all figure paints would because you need the shades from shadow to highlight, which can take 4 or 5 different shades of wash consistency paint over the original colour.

Reply to
fokkereiv

Dipping the brush sounds like a good idea. So does using a soft, sable-type brush. Tamiya acrylic brushes on a lot better if you mix it with GENUINE Tamiya thinner. Must be some glycol or something in there, because it actually seems to smooth the brushing more than it thins the paint, so you don't lose coverage.

Reply to
carswritsmall

It also helps a lot if you match the brush to the job. If you're painting a large area, use a wide brush so you can finish the job in fewer strokes and with minimum overlap. Look for artist's brushes, you'll find a better variety of shapes & sizes.

Reply to
Wayne C. Morris

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