Weighted tyres

It just occurred to me that whilst "weighted" tyres are now common on aircraft kits or in aftermarket sets for aircraft, I'm wondering if anyone produces weighted tyres for trucks, cars, etc?

I'm usually an aircraft modeller, so I'm not be up to speed on what's available in aftermarket sets for vehicles, but I often read AFV or vehicle kit and construction reviews of subjects outside my area of interest and I don't recall ever reading about weighted tyres.

Considering that vehicles spend all of their time with their wheels on the ground (unless overturned or on a service hoist), I'd have thought there'd be a demand for weighted tyres.

Cheers & Merry Christmas, James.

Reply to
James Venables
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Good point. Most cars come with vinyl tires so there's no need there. But for "soft skins'' and other kits I'd think there'd certainly be a niche for them. Guess I'll just have to heat up the cookie sheet to 110º and melt the plastic. Cheers, The Keeper (of too much crap!)

Reply to
Keeper

Many of the vehicles being modeled were made while multi-ply bias tires were standard equipment.

No sidewall bulge at all, unless near flat(under 4 psi) or very overloaded.

Modern Radial Tires, maybe. or DUWK tire for beach running. not much market beyond that.

But I could be wrong. Modelers seem to like that 'flat tire' look for aircraft, so who knows.

** mike **
Reply to
mike

The absolute WROST, and I mean the most out of touch are the *weighted* tires for carrier, and modern jet A/C !!

Reply to
AM

"AM" wrote

A flat ground contact surface is appropriate for any tire, even a solid rubber one. Bulging may not be, but an elastic tire that keeps its perfect circle shape under load is impossible. If true, it would defeat the purpose of having tires in the first place.

KL

Reply to
Kurt Laughlin

I've never seen any other than some wrinkle-wall slicks for dragsters.

One would think so but for some reason most car modelers seem to prefer rolling wheels over realism. Car and truck tires look more realistic when they have a slight flat spot where the rubber meets the road, so to speak. Model cars with perfectly round tires look like they're up on tippy-toe to me, making it a dead giveaway that one is looking at a model rather than the real thing - it's especially obvious when the model is posed/pictured in a scenic setting of some sort.

OTOH, it's often not very easy to flat spot a model car tire and the problem's made all the more difficult by having to get four the same.

Reply to
Al Superczynski

"Al Superczynski" wrote

I remember articles in Car Model back in the 1969-1972 era on how to flatten slicks on a flatiron. If you put a window screen on the iron you could make dirt track tires. I also remember the AMT "Piranha" dragster that was groundbreaking because it had two or three piece styrene slicks with wrinkle walls. Molded in white plastic, you could sand the lettering after painting to make it stand out. Never caught on though. . .

Car modelers like those vinyl tires . . . No aircraft or armor modeler would let them go without painting, and despite the fascination with machined "billet" parts, I don't think realism is priority #1 with car modelers.

KL

Reply to
Kurt Laughlin

Like the distinct lack of seatbelts?

It's not even laziness. It continues to perplex me how some car guys will detail out their engines with all those distributor wires, braided hoses, and the like; add cloth upholstery to the seats and floors; and yet refuse to add seatbelts. (I *have* seen seat harnesses in a couple of dragsters, but that's about it.)

- Sean F.

Reply to
SeanFallesen

"SeanFallesen" wrote

Perhaps a subconscious rebellion against them?

The overall lack of realism extends to (or from?) real car modelers, the Kustom Kar builders. At least one of the Barris or Roth creations didn't have a gas tank.

KL

Reply to
Kurt Laughlin

I do know that I prefer strongly tires that roll, props that spin and ailerons etc. that can be moved. Static display JUST DOES NOT CUT IT FOR ME. I would say that in some diorama work such things as "weighted tires" may improve the look of the display especially if the theme being modeled is of something dilapidated.

Tony

Reply to
Acejnova

"Hamilton Davidson" wrote

And not everyone who builds armor or aircraft is a detail nut either.

One thing about belts. They can be "realistically" portrayed (using whatever) in 1/32, 1/48, and even 1/72 aircraft. Why couldn't they be realistically portrayed in 1/24 cars?

KL

Reply to
Kurt Laughlin

"Al Superczynski" wrote

That may be. Almost all my exposure is from modeling mags. I do note a preternatural emphasis on paint finish (even on what are supposed to be drivable, regular, cars). Also, the cars are too clean. A never-driven, concourse champion, custom job? Well, OK, but a F1 or NASCAR car configured like one that won the last race of the season?

Perhaps this is too much off on a tangent, but one thing I thought quite odd was an article in the last issue on the IPMS Journal by Pat Covert (I think) encouraging people to make car models with really extreme amounts of detail, like fully machined drivetrain and suspension parts as such, with the goal of having cars than ran or moved via imbedded electric motors. His view was that this would gain "more acceptance" with the public, or something. I couldn't quite figure that one out.

KL

Reply to
Kurt Laughlin

Yeah, many car modelers go overboard on that. It's the other extreme from overly- or poorly-weathered aircraft and armor models...

Again, the really good car modelers do a nice job of weathering racing cars.

Mark Gustavson.

Whatever rows one's boat. See my sig.

Reply to
Al Superczynski

They can be and are but generally aren't included in the box. How many aircraft kits include separate belts?

Reply to
Al Superczynski

For those wanting to see how well seatbelt hardware can be done in plastic, have a look at the Fujimi Lambo Countach kit (and possibly in the other 'Enthusiast Series' kits as well) - stalks and buckles supplied, you cut out the belt. Really nice.

There's a stack of different PE sets available for automotive seat belts. As someone pointed out though, cars belt hardware tends to be somewhat manufacturer exclusive - different designs for different makers (although competition stuff is supplied by just a few companies - most of them available as PE sets), unlike a/c, which are all pretty close, with appropriate national differences. I think it's just that they tend to get forgotten in model cars, with all the excitment of getting the polish perfect. Or maybe it's not that important to the average car modeller. I build most things, including cars and a/c - my a/c ALWAYS get at least a couple of tape strips in the seat area to represent belts; my cars not so often. But if we're going to throw stones, why don't the a/c guys detail engines like the car guys do...? Diff'rent strokes... (c:

RobG

Reply to
Rob Grinberg

"Al Superczynski" wrote

He wasn't just talking about what he was doing, but what others SHOULD do: "None of us are doing all that could be done."

In some ways, I was reminded of something Merriman might write. Better, but akin nonetheless.

KL.

Reply to
Kurt Laughlin

Gustavson has done some beautiful models over time but he gets on these crusades. According to him 'everyone should be using beaten brass panels on their models and painting their cars with lacquer. He seems to forget that most of us are sufficiently happy with styrene.

Bill Banaszak, MFE

Reply to
Mad-Modeller

"Mad-Modeller" wrote

The article I mentioned begins: ""You know, there are some opportunities that static scale auto miniaturists builders [sic] should exploit if our segment of the hobby is going to grow, gain the respect of auto enthusiasts everywhere, and continue to attract the attention of the general public." It ends with, "For our hobby to remain viable, we must have aspirational goals that directly challenge commonly held beliefs about what can be done when building scale miniature automobiles."

Wow.

I build tank models. Whether or not I have the respect of real tankers is irrelevant to me, as is the attention level of the general public. In this respect at least, I don't think I'm that different from most of the rest of you. Why is he? It almost sounds like he took his models to an auto show once and somebody told him to "take your toys and go home."

I'm also a manufacturing engineer. When reading the article I thought, sure, with enough time and money, you could machine almost all the parts for a real car, but why would you want to?

Oh well, I don't build car models so it doesn't matter to me much. Much. Two or three years ago the IPMS rules were changed to remove the "percentage of plastic" rule. The stated rationale was very vague, but I suspect it was because someone realized that all these award-winning custom car models with billet (*) aluminum details and hammered brass body panels didn't contain enough plastic to be legally entered into an IPMS contest.

KL

(*) It puzzles me why they continue to call things "billet" when obviously neither the real parts nor their scale counterparts were made from billets but plate, bar, and extrusions. I wouldn't use "billet" or any other rolled stock to make some of the parts I've seen. They're weaker, heavier, and more likely to distort than forgings or castings. Looks - and sounds - cool, I guess.

Reply to
Kurt Laughlin

Kurt Laughlin wrote: : : Oh well, I don't build car models so it doesn't matter to me much. Much. : Two or three years ago the IPMS rules were changed to remove the "percentage : of plastic" rule. : It was more than "two or three" years ago - more like 5 or 6. : : The stated rationale was very vague, but I suspect it was : because someone realized that all these award-winning custom car models with : billet (*) aluminum details and hammered brass body panels didn't contain : enough plastic to be legally entered into an IPMS contest. : How about tanks? Fruilmodel tracks were available at the time the rule was removed. How do you determine 75% plastic (or resin) when using metal track links? Whether you use parts count or percentage of weight of finished model, you are not going to achieve 75% with those installed.

The rule had serious implications on sailing ship models, which are more wood than anything else, scratch built cars, which can use a lot of sheet stock, and Hasegawa and Model Expo model airplane kits in the 1/16 and 1/8 scales, which are mostly wood, aside from the Tripe.

The rationale wasn't vague.

Bruce

Reply to
Bruce Burden

I vaguely remember back when I first stumbled into rms that Gustavson was on here trying to spread the gospel of lacquer and 'serious' automotive building. ISTR him being roughly handled and he hasn't been back to my knowledge.

He does frequent the Hobby Heaven message board. I can't recall any speeches there, though. I don't know if this has anything to do with it but he's a lawyer.

Bill Banaszak, MFE

Reply to
Mad-Modeller

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