WWI Research

Progress is good on the new WWI/72 book with almost 3,300 listings so
far, with 1,490 aircraft alone.
What I need is help with is identifying items other than aircraft,
aircraft interiors, aircraft wings and control surfaces and aircraft
conversions as being WWI or not.
Subjects that I could use some hellp with include:
Vehicles
Aircraft Engines/Props/Cowlings/Exhausts
Aircraft Armament including guns and bombs
Aircraft Ground Equipment
Aircraft Landing Gear
Aircraft Decals
Figures
Vehicles
Vehicle conversions
Vehicle parts & Accessories
Vehicle decals
Artillery
Railroad Engines & Rolling Stock
Ships & Boats
Structures
Diorama subjects
If you can help with even a single subject please let me know.
TIA
Tom
Reply to
maiesm72
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With US railroads you might want to check up on items listed as USRA. Not all of the designs actually entered service and those that did were usually modified over time. I assume you know that during the war the government took over the railroads in this country. To make rolling stock more interchangable the USRA drew up plans for everything from one end of the train to the other.
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad Modeller
Thanks, Bill. That helps. My knowledge of railway stuff is pretty bad.After a couple of WWI vehicles I'm going to tackle one of their armored trains. Probably a year-long project.TomOn Sep 11, 10:43=A0pm, Mad Modeller wrote:> " snipped-for-privacy@netscape.com" wrote:> > > Progress is good on the new WWI/72 book with almost 3,300 listings so> > far, with 1,490 aircraft alone.>
aircraft,> > aircraft interiors, aircraft wings and control surfaces and aircraft> > conversions as being WWI or not.> > > Subjects that I could use some hellp with include:> > > Vehicles> > Aircraft Engines/ Props/Cowlings/Exhausts> > Aircraft Armament including guns and bombs>
Decals> > Figures> > Vehicles> > Vehicle conversions> > Vehicle parts & Accessories> > Vehicle decals> > Artillery> > Railroad Engines & Rolling Stock> > Ships & Boats> > Structures> > Diorama subjects> > > If you can help with even a single subject please let me know.> > > TIA> > > Tom> > With US railroads you might want to check up on items listed as USRA.> Not all of the designs actually entered service and those that did were> usually modified over time.> I assume you know that during the war the government took over the> railroads in this country. =A0To make rolling stock more interchangable> the USRA drew up plans for everything from one end of the train to the> other.> > Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.- Hide quoted text -> > - Show quoted text -
Reply to
maiesm72
Glad to help. It occurred to me today that wooden ends on boxcars were very common yet and almost all the cars used the Type K braking system. The outstanding thing about that is it used a vertical brake staff at the end of the car. The brake wheels would then be horizontal and easily reached by the brakemen walking along the roof walks. Steel bodied cars were still fairly new and many had a deep fishbellied mainframe underneath. Hopper cars were usually wooden bodies mounted on steel frames; tank cars were generally short and made of steel. Flats were usually around 40 feet long with wooden decks, sometimes on wood frames, sometimes steel. It was in the 'teens when the PRR designed and built their first steel caboose. Given their use of pusher engines getting over the Alleghenies, it was deemed safer for rail crews to have the protection of steel construction since a wooden car could and did crush easily. I 'think'(but I'd have to check) that archbar trucks (bogeys) were still legal into the '20s. Andrews and 'Bettendorfs' were the newer thing in trucks at the time. Somewhere in my files I have an article from one of the RR model mags that outlines all of the truck business.
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad Modeller

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