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Hi;
Read with interest about the problem with a conflict between Autocad and
SW.
Please answer a question for a total beginner. I am a level I Autocad
user. I am just beginning to delve into a SW book and know very little.
Does the aforementioned conflict imply that 2-d drawings drawn in Acad,
are opened in SW and extruded to 3-d? If this is so, how is the format
converted from .dwg?
Thanking you in advance,
Guido De Angelis
Reply to
Guido De Angelis
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Guido,
This can be done, but it's not worth the trouble. 2D ACAD data often contains lines on lines, endpoints that aren't coincident, non tangencies, and other geometric no-no's. The 2D to 3D tool in SW is more of a marketing gimick, than a usefull feature.
Using 2d ACAD data is not for the novice either. A considerable amount of SW knowledge is necessary in order to be successfull, even in the very few instances when doing this might be a viable option.
You need to learn how to sketch properly to use SW. As I've already told you, ACAD users have the toughest time. You have to put what you know about ACAD out of your mind or you'll never get it. ACAD knowlege is usless for learning SW, in fact, it's a handicap. You might want to get the book "Solidworks for ACAD users". It helped a long time ACAD user at my work. Still,, he was the last person to become productive with SW.
Regards
Mark
Reply to
MM
Solidworks does have some powerful tools for turning 2D drawings into 3D models. Tools include ways to superimpose views on one another and clean up line-on-line conditions. However, as was mentioned, it is not for the novice.
Also, most of the 2D Autocad drawings I've converted have someflaws that make it difficult to produce accurate 3D models. This is usually due to the Autocad drawing have inaccurate geometry or geometry that is inconsistent between views, often because the Autocad user "cheated" on his drawing. For that reason, never accept an Autocad drawing as being geometrically accurate; always double-check.
Reply to
TheTick
I'm not sure of the conflict you speak of?? Yes SW will open DWG/DXF files from AutoCAD (and other systems). There is no format change, SW reads native DWG/DXF files. You can use these DWG/DXF files as sketches in your SW models for building features. It works very well. If I ever have a problem it's because the DWG/DXF saved from AutoCAD isn't fully closed and SW likes fully closed sketches. You just need to find a way to patch the hole(s). The best method I have found is to convert your DWG/DXF drawing in AutoCAD to all polylines using the PEDIT command and choosing the JOIN option. This connects any gaps autoCAD may have had. Import your sketch in SW and it works perfectly (98% of the time).
I also was an AutoCAD user (still do on occasion). Here is an opinion, forget about AutoCAD. SW and other 3D parametric modelers are truly the future and where the next innovation lies. As far as I'm concerned AutoCAD is 20 yr old tech and it's better left behind. 3D CAD will make you a more valuable employee than 2D AutoCAD ever will.
Reply to
Rob Rodriguez
There can be two types of data in a dwg file. Usually the data is 2D, but 3D data can also be present. We will discuss 2D data.
In day to day use a SW user will either need to look at a 2D drawing or use the 2D drawing in a 3D model. If you only need to look at the 2D drawing then it can be imported directly into the SW drawing document or DWGEditor can be used. DWGEditor is very much like ACAD.
If you need to put the 2D drawing into a 3D model, there are tools for converting the 2D orthographic projection into a 3D model. From experience, it is not infrequent to find that the 2D orthographic projection is wrong in which case interpretation will have to take place. Nevertheless, a 2D projection can be extruded, revolved and otherwise used as the basis for a 3D model in SW.
Guido De Angelis wrote:
Reply to
P.
There is more than one way to convert your autocad drawings 2D to 3D method can be helpful at times but definitely isn't a catch all and definitely needs good understanding of SW.
What I use may times though is copy and paste from autocad. if you open your part in AutoCad assuming you have AutoCad you can copy and paste sketches. This is quite helpful for us for 2 reasons. Most of the models that would require this method are sheetmetal so they only have one drawing view "Flat Pattern" and also since our company uses CAM software the 2D data is accurate 90% of the time. I always autodimension the sketch and check it directly to the autocad dimensions. If they are different most of the time a few minor adjustments will do the trick.
Good luck
Corey
Reply to
Corey Scheich
Corey,
Yea,, all good ideas, But.....
I think Guido is wanting to use ACAD "instead" of the SW sketcher because he understands it. This is a terrible way to use SW.
He's probably creating overly complex skectces with a bazillion lines and arcs, and then attempts to constrain and dimension things after the fact. Of course the geometry will jump around in unpredictable ways. After a few dimensions, the sketch won't look anything like the original, and he gets frustrated. This is what I went through with our resident hard-core ACAD guy years ago.
Guido,,
If this describes you, keep the sketches simple. Dimension and constrain as you go. Use features (fillets, holes) and additional sketch based features for details.
Regards
Mark
Reply to
MM
ah yes, that would be quite a tragic way to use a parametric modeler. You might a well build the solid in AutoCRUD and import it thru step. And that would be more tragic yet.
Corey
Reply to
Corey Scheich

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