Wiring harness drawings?

Can anyone point me to some examples or email me some? My boss needs one of these and I'm completely in the dark about the format of one.
Thanks, Jeff
email me at snipped-for-privacy@byersnospaceprecision.com (replace the'nospace's with nothing)
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I don't have an example handy, but you might try a Google search for "nailboard drawing." These drawings mimic the manual process of creating the harness, which involves laying it out full scale on a board with nails driven to represent runs and termination points. The wires are then strung along the nails. Nailboard drawings are usually done full-scale.
Cheers, Walt
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WJ wrote:

Nailboard drawings USED to be very often done full scale before large size plotters went by the wayside for so many companies. Oftentimes now they are scaled, and sometimes they are multiple sheet to show long harnesses (some lengths continued from one sheet to another). But at least one of two other documents (and often both kinds) usually accompanied nailboard drawings. One was a symbolic wiring diagram and the other was a wiring list. Wiring diagrams usually show devices as rectangular blocks and connectors as rows of numbered pins or sockets with the reference designator of the connector at top, like so:
J1 P1 1>----- - - - 1<------ - - - 2>----- - - - 2<------ - - - 3>----- - - - 3<------ - - - 4>----- - - - 4<------ - - -
Some people will tell you that J reference designators are "Jacks" which are always symbolized as female and P reference designators are "Plugs" which are always symbolized as male. About half right. "Jacks" are the more relatively fixed of mating pairs and should be given a J reference designation under MOST circumstances and "Plugs" are the more relatively movable of mating pairs and should be given a P reference designation under most circumstances . . . but either one can be either gender. The gender of the symbol should jibe with whether the connector has pins (male symbol) or sockets (female symbol), and also has nothing at all to do with how the connector shells are relative to one another (whether one shell fits inside the mating connector's shell). When two connectors are both equally movable or fixed the assignment of J or P reference designation should jibe with the gender of the connections themselves as above, BUT there are plenty of exceptions there also.
The symbology of wiring diagrams pretty much follows the symbology of schematic diagrams, which itself is governed by what used to be called IEEE Std 316 / ANSI Std Y32.2. I don't know what it goes by now. Assignment of reference designations for wiring harnesses and wiring diagrams should follow either the Unit Numbering Method or the Block Numbering Method of IEEE Std 200.
Mark 'Sporky' Stapleton Watermark Design, LLC www.h2omarkdesign.com
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I used to design the harnesses for the Gleaner combines back before AGCO left town. If you would like an example of how we did it, let me know and I can probably get a copy of one.
WT
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