Advice on layout



WHOA! Roger, it was just to practice with. Yeah, the OP will quickly figure out that the plywood is a pain to work on directly. He might want to put a 4x8 of homasote on it (lot's easier to spike down). I think what Puck was suggesting was that he, the OP, practice designing simply layouts and then putting them down (a little extrapolation there). Make something simple work then try something a little harder AND the OP will get some hands on and perhaps figure out what he likes about Model Railroad'n.
My first attempts at almost everything I've gotten into has been crap. BUT I learned a lot and had fun with it.

Good advice. Some on line resources like ldsig, groups.yahoo.com/group/small-layout-design, groups.yahoo.com/group/trackplansandsketches, ...
Find a club and start hanging out. He doesn't have to join. Look, ask ...
Paul
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK. You're forgiven.
-- Cheers
Roger T. Home of the Great Eastern Railway at:- http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra / Latitude: 48° 25' North Longitude: 123° 21' West
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Puck made the suggestion.
Paul
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Feb 15, 12:55�am, snipped-for-privacy@mail.wan.vpn (Paul Newhouse) wrote:

Hmmm... My first attempt at brain surgery was a disaster - the patient died. ;)
I'm with Roger. Go buy "Track Planning for Realistic Operation by John Armstrong" and "Trackwork and Lineside Detail"... both by Kalmback - probably available at Amazon if you can't find locally. These will help to give some good concepts of prototypical railroads for the model railroad and how to achieve them. In other words maybe if a lot of modelers read these books first they could have saved a lot of time and got the layout they wanted the first time around and not spend 5-10 years to "learn" by building 2, 3, 4 layouts to get it right.
I would also add that another way to learn is to join a local club if one is so inclined. It usually pays to hang out with & pick the brains of those more experienced.
Doug
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Brain surgery was one of those I got right the first time! *8^)

Hmmm, I've heard this recently, from a very wise sage ... where was that??
Paul
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/14/2008 8:40 PM Roger T. spake thus:

If the suggestion is that the O.P. build a temporary layout first, how about this: use screws to secure the track directly to the plywood. A little more effort, to be sure, but it would allow them to reclaim the track with absolutely no damage when they go to build their permanent layout.
(Putting in screws would involve drilling pilot holes, say with a Dremel, and putting in very small round-head screws.)
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The problem with screws is if you get them too tight (which is easy to do), they'll throw the track out of gauge. (It's the same with nails, but more difficult.)
If you use short and sharp sheet metal screws, you may be able to put them in by hand and feel your way to the proper tightness. This is N scale, however, so it may be harder to find the right size screw.
Puckdropper
--
Marching to the beat of a different drum is great... unless you're in
marching band.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/15/2008 3:15 PM Puckdropper spake thus:

Good point, and having never worked with N scale, is there even enough room for rolling stock to clear a small round-head screw on top of the ties? I'm thinking something like a #3 or 4 screw (pretty teeny-tiny).
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why waste the time?... if it's all about temporary and not learning how to lay track properly why not just go out and buy premade Bachmann track (with the real simulated plastic ballast look) , snap it together and Voila! Instant layout! Screw... no wait... forget the damn screws, OR tacks, nails, white glue, CA, Barge (for that Rod Stewart twist), liquid gooy stuff, duct tape, staples, bailing wire and any other means of mechanical bond.
Heck, forget the plywood... just plop it down on the living room floor and pretend the plush carpet is a vast sea of vegetative scenery.
Doug
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/16/2008 11:57 PM stealthboogie spake thus:

Don't see a call for all the sarcasm; several other folks here suggested that maybe the OP would do well by treating this layout as an experimental first project. So I fail to see the harm in screwing, or otherwise *temporarily* fastening *real* track (not EZ-track) to a plywood deck. The idea is to get a feel for how to lay track, and how to design a layout, and do it in such a way that the track can be retrieved and reused when they decide to build a *real* layout.
Is that OK with you?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

But it's not about a temporary layout. It's about an expendable first layout. It's more important to get track connected together properly than go through all the trouble of roadbed, track plans, and all that. If, at the end of the day you don't know what a quality track connection feels like, or looks like, your trains will never run right. Laying track directly on plywood eliminates all but one or two other factors. It's learning to walk on your skates on carpet before you even attempt to learn to skate on ice.
If the OP feels after laying a loop of track on plywood that he's learned enough to start a real layout, that's great. If not, he can take the track up and try a different system. Perhaps throw a snap switch in there and have a siding. As a kid, doing this kept me busy for quite some time. I learned how quality track connections were made, and when I "became a model railroader" (rather than a kid with a trainset) and started using cork roadbed, the trackwork was quite good.
Puckdropper
--
Marching to the beat of a different drum is great... unless you're in
marching band.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Back in the mid-seventies, two friends and myself decided to build a model railroad in a garage. We fussed and fumed over the track plan for about three weeks until one of the guys said in frustration, "Let's just put the tracks down and play with the trains!" That we did and were happy. It's still good advice.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

    I don't agree on Noisy. However, I do agree that its hard to drive track nails into some grades of plywood. If you can push a push pin in... without it being overforced... Track Nails are fine. If you Can't... Then track nails are going to bend like crazy! My current HO layout is OSB and the track nails went in well. I, however, am going to give cork roadbed a try.
--

From the Desk of the Sysop of:
Planet Maca's Opus, a Free open BBS system. telnet://pinkrose.dhis.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.