Temporary Display Layout on Styrofoam

Hi, I'm whipping together a temporary display layout (just an oval, 2x3, n-scale). I plan to use styrofoam (pink or blue) as the base and
for rough contours. Do I need to glue some 1/4" ply on the bottom for strength or to prevent crumbling or help it survive the trip from my shop to display area?
The display will rest completely on a flat surface, so the foam is only bearing the weight of the layout itself.
Thanks, Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes. Traveling layouts need extra support. I'd recommend either using a super high quality 1/4" plywood or a decent quality (4-ply) 1/2" ply.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris wrote:

Yes, I would advise that if you are starting with a 1" layer for the base, the plywood will make the layout sturdy enough to carry around. However, if you make the base of 2" or thicker styrofoam, you probably won't need the plywood reinforcement.
I built a 32"x48" display layout on 4" black styrofoam for a base (and "sea level"), and 1" pink foam for the contours. I glued two pieces of 14/" ply 32"x8" crosswise underneath, because the 4" foam was in two pieces, and I didn't trust the glued joint between them. As it turned out, I didn't really need the wood.
HTH
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SNIP

Figures. I have 1.5" foam. Right between your recommendations! 3" is probably going to be "un-aesthetic" to the customer (SWMBO).
4"? Black? I've seen thick blocks of white expanded foam (the stuff made of little beads pressed together) used as flotation for cottage docks and I've seen pink, blue and green, but never black. Any idea what it is used for in the real world?
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris wrote:

The black stuff comes in 3-1/2" and 4" thicknesses, and is used in the walls between studs. A friend who's in construction gave me cut offs. They also make nice high cliffs. ;-) Up here in the North, we insulate to keep the heat in. Down south, where it gets real hot in summer, it should be used to keep the heat out. But it isn't. Dunno why. Maybe overheated brains don't think straight. ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 07 Dec 2007 15:33:35 -0500, Wolf Kirchmeir wrote:

Is it available with foil facing for radiant transfer resistance (down here we'd put it with the foil facing out)?
--
Steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Caple wrote:

Yes, since its job is to reflect infrared. I installed aluminised vapour barrier for this reason. Also messes up radio and TV reception, however. OTOH, it shields over 90% of the wireless network from snooping. You have to be just in correct line with one of two windows to get a signal from it outside the house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 08 Dec 2007 08:39:14 -0500, Wolf Kirchmeir wrote:

DIY Faraday cage - neat!
--
Steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SNIP

AFAIK, the building code up here (Ontario) doesn't require anything to address ir transfer. It does require continuous vapour barrier on the warm side (to keep ice from forming in the walls) and continuous air infiltration barrier (ie Tyvek) on the cold side (to keep the drafts out).
My wireless net is reasonably locked down, but my son's friends frequently use the neighbour's wide open wifi link when they come over to our house (since I won't get them the keys to mine!!!).
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.