Applying Ballast

Would this be the correct way for the majority of the population in
this newsgroup to lay ballast:
I have cork under track. This is laid already. I was going to spray
a glue mixure (water and Elmers Glue in a spray bottle.....recomended
by a friend) on the track/cork, then sprinkle the ballast. Is this
the way it is done? If so, what is the best way to keep the glue off
the track? Tape? Any other suggestions?
Reply to
Mike
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That is a good way to create a large mess. The ballast would stick to the top of the ties as well as the rail.
Mike wrote:
Reply to
Charles Kimbrough
Would this be the correct way for the majority of the population in this newsgroup to lay ballast: I have cork under track. This is laid already. I was going to spray a glue mixure (water and Elmers Glue in a spray bottle.....recomended by a friend) on the track/cork, then sprinkle the ballast. Is this the way it is done? If so, what is the best way to keep the glue off the track? Tape? Any other suggestions? ---------------------------------------------------- Here are some sites with ballasting how-to:
Bill Carl's Page with Photos:
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Phil Anderson's Page:
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Alexandre's Page (different method):
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My Ballasting Page (different method):
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Be patient. Ballasting can be a frustrating experience but it's worth the effort. Good luck!
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad:
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History of N Scale:
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Links to over 700 helpful sites:
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Reply to
Bill
Spraying of glue: No bueno.
Spray ballast after in place with 50/50 mix of water and isopropyl alcohol, then dribble on 50-25-25 mix of water, isoprpyl, and white glue. Touch up and shape ballast while wet as needed here and there.
-John
Reply to
Pacific95
You kinda have it backwards. First you lay the ballast, smooth it out make it look as realistic as possible, THEN spray your glue/water mix on. I forget the exact mixture, but it's not a whole lot of glue, and way more water. Something like 1 part glue and 8 parts water, if I recall (been a long time since I've done it. You won't exactly be able to keep the glue off the track, you'll just have to use a track cleaner afterward to clean the rail...something like a "Bright Boy".
Reply to
Slingblade
Mke,
As was already stated, the ballest goes down first and then your adhesive. I have never tried the water alcohol mix to wet the ballest. I use "wet water" which I define as water mixed with two or three drops of dish washing detergent. I use the Woodland Scenics spray bottle to mix my water and soap and - of course - to spray with. Then I take a large - three inch long - eye dropper and put on Elmer's white glue mixed with water - about 50/50 mix, also with a drop of soap mixed in. Best thing to do, is take a scrap piece of wood and put down some cork and track. Practice on that until you feel comfortable actually ballesting on your railroad. Oh yeah - one more thing. When you get to turnouts, be very careful with your ballest and glue. I put a small amount of oil - LaBelle or something light - on the place where the points are hinged and also on the surfaces that the points mate against to protect them from the water/glue.
Bob Rule, Jr.
Reply to
EBTBOB
Not really! Here is the procedure I use
1. spread ballast first, be sure it looks the way you want it. us a small brush to clean off ties. 2. mix a bottle of glue, 25 to 50 % elmers. use something with a snap open applicator such a a Pantene shampoo bottle. 3. mix in a spray bottle a wetting agent, 5 or 6 drops of detergent to a bottle of water
4. carefully wet the area ready to be glued. mist only, direct spray will move the ballast 5. while wet, flow a large amount of the glue mixture between the rails. the wetting agent will allow the glue to wick out through the ballast.
6. let it dry and the most that should be needed is to clean the top of the rails
7. switches are much harder, don't flow the the glue carefully apply the glue mixture with an eye dropper and make sure all moving parts remain free and moving.
There are many reports in the modeling magazine with better detail.
Ron
Mike wrote:
Reply to
Ronald Gardner
And the spray bottle works fine for you?
I just thought I'd ask to be sure because just a few weeks ago Frank Eva reported problems getting a fine mist from his WS spray bottle. And despite him asking if anyone else had problems (and getting 25 replied to the thread), no one else reported problems with the WS sprayer.
I'm beginning to think that Frank's experience was just a single troublesome sprayer and not an indication of all of the WS sprayers.
Reply to
Mark Mathu
Mark,
I have Woodland Scenics bottles that I was able to get a spray out of some that have not. The point here is that any bottle that can produce a spray as opposed to just a stream will work for the purposes of ballesting.
Bob
Reply to
EBTBOB
The technique I used years ago when I had an HO layout was to mix powdered glue with the ballast. Spread the dry mixture, then wet it with a fine spray. The water activated the dry glue, and stuck the ballast in place.
I don't remember the proportions exactly, but maybe 1 part glue to 3 ballast. I don't know if you can get powdered glue anywhere these days, but if you can, the method worked very well.
-- Bill Kaiser snipped-for-privacy@mtholyoke.edu
There are three ways to do a job: good, cheap, and quick. You can have any two. A good, cheap job won't be quick. A good, quick job won't be cheap. A cheap, quick job won't be good.
Reply to
<wkaiser
I've been using Arizona Rock ballast (it's real rock) and I don't mist it at all. I just use an eyedropper to apply WS Scenic Cement. Since the ballast is relatively heavy, it does not float and the cement soaks right in. I find it easier and better looking than the WS ballast products and it cost about the same. in article snipped-for-privacy@mb-m29.aol.com, EBTBOB at snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote on 11/19/03 4:36 AM:
Reply to
Edward A. Oates
: : And the spray bottle works fine for you? : : I just thought I'd ask to be sure because just a few weeks ago Frank Eva : reported problems getting a fine mist from his WS spray bottle. And despite : him asking if anyone else had problems (and getting 25 replied to the : thread), no one else reported problems with the WS sprayer. : : I'm beginning to think that Frank's experience was just a single troublesome : sprayer and not an indication of all of the WS sprayers. : : -- : Mark Mathu : The Green Bay Route:
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"I started out with nothing and I still have most of it."
I should have replied to Frank's post; I have not had good luck with the WS sprayer when spraying the "Scenic Glue/Water mix" or whatever it is called. Their sprayer worked fine with wet water or alcohol water but the glue just clogged things up. Nowadays I use the wet/alcohol/water spray to start and add the glue mix with an eyedropper for most applications.
Reply to
KTØT
Several replies in this thread mention to use White (Elmer's) Glue. I was under the impression NOT to use white glue, but matte medium; as white glue will leave a whitish film. Am I correct?
Chris Curren
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Reply to
Chris Curren
Matte Medium can leave a film of white crustys behind if it is mixed too thick. The common mistake is to mix it as one would mix white glue, say 33% each of white glue, water, and rubbing alcohol. MM is mixed thinner, say 20-25% to 37% each of water and alcohol. White glue can leave a satin sheen if mixed too thick but I've never seen a white film. It dries clear. MM dries softer so it doesn't transmit so much noise but I don't think it's a huge difference. Still, alot of people just love it. I use white glue, mostly for cost. MM ain't cheap. Benchwork is your main concern on noise control.
-John
Reply to
Pacific95
On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 21:32:33 GMT, "Chris Curren" under the impression NOT to use white glue, but matte medium; as white glue

I always had good luck with Elmers glue, water and a bit of dish washing liquid. Never noticed any whitish film.
Reply to
Slingblade
"Some folks calls it white glue, I calls it Elmers glue. Ummhmmm"
-John
Reply to
Pacific95
Matte medium isn't that expensive if you goto Walmart and buy Modgepodge - same stuff.
I think I learned that here from Big John - may he rest in peace.
Reply to
Larry Blanchard
I do it exactly the same way as Bob, my spray bottle is an old household cleaner bottle. A Windex bottle works well too, once you've used the Windex, the bottle is free!
Don
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Reply to
Trainman
I tried it once and didn't care for it. "John's Lab" sold the powdered glue as part of their ballast line, although Weldwood had a similar product at any hardware store. I haven't looked for it lately.
Don
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Reply to
Trainman

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