Can the straight path through a turnout be considered diverging?

I'm installing dwarf signals to indicate turnout setting, using green for normal and yellow for diverging. Usually normal is straight and
diverging is the curved or angle leg of the turnout. I just reached a place where straight takes the train into the yard and curved continues on the main line. Would the prototype signal the straight as diverging (yellow) and the curved as normal (green)?
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It depends. If you are using "route signaling" (where the interlocking signals tell the engineer what route he is lined up to take), then having the main line curved route show green and the route into the yard show yellow could be appropriate. In the US after about 1900, particularly on the big eastern roads (PRR, NYC, B&O, etc.), "speed signaling" became popular (where the signals tell the engineer how fast he can go, but not necessarily which route he is taking). In this case, you might want the route into the yard to show "slow clear" which is often green on a dwarf, and the main line route to show "limited clear" (often flashing green on a dwarf) or "medium clear" (sometimes green over flashing red on a dwarf) depending on how sharp the turnout is (limited speed is often 45 mph, medium 30, and slow 15). Geezer
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Geezer wrote:

Huh? What route signalling systems code routes in that manner?
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On Mar 7, 4:28 pm, Eddie Oliver

TMTC currently uses this style of signalling throughout it's entire system. PNWR *might* be doing the same between Wilsonville, OR and Beaverton, OR since PNWR's passenger operations are in conjunction with TMTC; it wouldn't entirely surprise me if TMTC engineers end up taking the controls on PNWR's trackage once their joint passenger service starts.
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"Old.Professor" wrote:

The "problem" there is the use of the term "straight".
Different railways used different terms, such as "main" and "diverging"or secondary". Using those terms the curve becomes "main" and the straight becomes "diverging".
Regards, Greg.P.
PS Ignore the ensuing posts from Ray, Steve, etc which will point out that I'm anti-american, racist, stupid, syphilus laden, Bin Laden, ...
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Why would you think it's necessary for anyone to point those things out?
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On Sat, 8 Mar 2008 20:33:58 -0800, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

It's tough but someone has to do it. -- Ray
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Ray Haddad wrote:

So long as we give you something to do between dole cheques.
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On Sun, 09 Mar 2008 18:03:17 +1300, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

I own lots of stock in Dole Pineapple. Hawaii is my oyster. -- Ray
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Ray Haddad wrote:

Hawaii produces oysters? I didn't know that!
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On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 05:59:57 +1300, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

The best oysters come from the Gulf of Mexico but Hawaii is sort of surrounded by ocean just like you, Greg. Tasman sea oysters are passable but the local bed oysters here are flavorless to me. -- Ray
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Ray Haddad wrote:

The best oysters are Bluff oysters.
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"P. Roehling" wrote:

If I could fathom out the workings of your little minds I wouldn't have bothered to mention it.
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On 11 Mar 2008 20:16:41 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@remove.daxack.ca.invalid (Calvin Henry-Cotnam) wrote:

As a rule the "normal" route would be for a main track (which could be a main line track, a yard lead, branch line main track, etc...), and the "reverse" route would be an auxillary route such as a yard track, an industry track, etc. In most places the rules say switches must be left in the "normal" position when you are done using them, except under certain circumstances. This way future trains arriving would not have a switch against them on a main route. In yards, often certain switches are designated to be left in a certain position but most switches in most yards are not designated, because there is not "normal" route. Most railroads require trains to move at restricted speed looking out for improperly lined switches in yards, so in most areas of the year there is no necessity for such rules regarding normal and reverse routes, unless it is specified in timetable instructions for whatever reason.
A common example would be generally they want switches to be left lined AWAY from engine terminals, repair tracks, and so forth unless you are in the process of entering or leaving those facilities..
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On Fri, 7 Mar 2008 12:30:44 -0800 (PST), "Old.Professor"

Whatever route the main track takes would be considered the normal route. whether some type of dwarf signal is used, or a simple metal target on the switch, you would show the "clear" route for the main route and "diverging" for the auxillary tracks.
Just as an example, the Freight Lead at Inman Yard in Atlanta GA takes a sharp turn to the right at the #3 switch on the south end, if you continued straight you'd go down Forwarding Yard Three, but the right turn continues on down the freight lead. The target on the #3 switch is white for the freight lead and red for Forwarding Yard #3 (and so are the rest of the targets down that ladder.
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Good example. Thanks.
-Pete
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Roger T. wrote:

Is this your layout at www.highspeedplus.com? Or is it club sponsored.
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"Big Al"

It's mine. In my basement.
-- Cheers
Roger T. Home of the Great Eastern Railway at:- http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra / Latitude: 48 25' North Longitude: 123 21' West
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Roger T. wrote:

And a fine layout it is, too. I previoulsy visited about a year ago.
Pretty large tender for #164, eh?
--
wolf k.

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