GAS ELECTRIC ENGINE

Erik Olsen DK wrote:
> Here is one example of a gasoline driven motor car with


Erik, what can you tell me about this railcar? It reminds me a bit of the Triangel cars...
Cheers,
Mark.
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Mark Newton wrote:

This one was built by Scandia of Randers.
Triangel of Odense mostly made smaller four- or six-wheeled rail cars but also a few larger types. The larger Scandia and Triangel cars were about the same size, had similar-looking bodies and both had a mechanical transmissions. They were a little different in that the Scandia cars had two trucks, whereas the Triangel cars had three trucks (a rather odd design, actually).
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Best regards
Erik Olsen
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On 10 Apr 2007 05:48:51 -0700, in alt.usenet.kooks, snipped-for-privacy@aim.com wrote:

Actually Steve/Mark is correct...
Some railcars like the FRA T-10 have a Hydraulic Transmission...

--
Bob Officer
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Mark Newton wrote:

Alright alright. I should have clearly stated that I was describing US practice. Sorry about that.
David Starr
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I thought those Rio Grande things were regular transmission with a clutch. In fact the whole front end was a car, right?? They at times would pull a small trailer. I'm not sure they were classified as a rail car however.
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Jon Miller wrote:

The DRGW galloping goose/geese. Yes, these were rail conversions of ordinary medium trucks. Flanged wheels and bus like bodies were added on. The drive was same-same as when they were trucks going over the road, floor shift gearbox and a clutch. The doodlebugs were 80 foot combines (baggage&passenger), a considerably larger and heavier machine. "Railcar" as a noun is pretty generic, and has been used to describe just about anything running on rails, be it powered or non powered. For instance novelist Tom Clancy has his Moscow police inspector say of a murdered hobo, "I think he just got on the wrong railcar at the wrong time". I am not aware of a generic term for "self propelled rail vehicle", which would include the doodlebugs, the RDC's and the galloping geese.
David Starr
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David Starr wrote:

The Geese ran on the RGS, not the D&RG.
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Rick Jones
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David Starr wrote:
> Mark Newton wrote: > >> David Starr wrote:
> Alright alright. I should have clearly stated that I was describing > US practice. Sorry about that.
Again, not true.
McKeen cars, Sykes cars, Mack railbuses, Service Motor/Brill Model 55 and 75 cars all had mechanical drives, with gearboxes and clutches.
Then there's the small industrial locos known generically as 'critters' - quite a number of them had mechanical drives as well.
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