How To Make Window Glazing

I purchased a used HO caboose and it had nice clear window glazing applied. I had to wash the car off and the window glazing immediately
turned white and partially dissolved into an Elmer's glue type paste. I've been trying various water based glues but have been unsuccessful trying to duplicate the original clear glazing. Anyone know what is used to make the glazing? Thanks
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Not sure what it's called but I bought some from Micro-Mark a couple years back.
Bob

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That sounds like the glazing was made using Microscale Krystal Klear, a similar competitor, or a home-made concoction using white glue.
You should be able to recreate it using Krystal Klear. This will take you to Microscale's web page on the product: http://tinyurl.com/yht6uy
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Any suggestions on how to make such a home-made concoction? Many thanks, Art
--


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Art Robb wrote:

Why not just use products mentioned in the thread? They aren't *THAT* expensive (couple of dollars). Plain Elmers white glue might work too.
Personally I don't like this type of glazing. It never looks like flat glass but more like a lens. That is due to the way it dries. It dries concave and thin in the middle and thick on the perimeter. IMO, that looks like crap. I much rather glue in some thin clear styrene, acetate or similar plastic sheet. Some people actually use micorscope slide glass covers for the ultimate "real glass" effect. That looks great especially in larger scales.
Peteski
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Sure, but when adding secondary details to models (such as cars) it is very simple. How do you glue styrene inside of auto models? I typically use Krystal Klear but welcome your suggestion.
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Mark Mathu wrote:

I remember an article (MR?) where the author used/cast auto models of clear plastic and then painted everything but the windows.
-- It's turtles, all the way down
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Mark Mathu wrote:

You're correct. In certain applications (like model automobile windows), Krystal Klear works ok and is the easiest solution to use. In those applications the car bodies are usually molded with quite thin walls, so that helps in the Krystal Kleas to set up quite thin throughout the entire opening. Also. most automotive windows are curved so, Krystal Klear doesn't look too odd.
But in most rolling stock, windows are supposed to be flat and the wall thickness of those models caused Krystal Klear to harden up concave. So, plastic glazing looks more realistic.
Someone else mentioned Mica as a good material for dirty windows. That works, but I think Mica has too much of a metallic-like sheen. It looks more silver than transparent.
Peteski
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Well, they say that nothing looks more like wood than wood. Similarly, nothing looks more like glass than glass. I've used microscope cover glasses normally used to hold a specimin to a microscope slide. Cutting it is tricky but you can bet that it's optically flat and as clear as possible.
Norm
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Peter W. wrote:

Not entirely all that exciting, but in the current month's Model Railroader there is a review on the Walthers Flour Mill and Grain Elevator buildings - what's relevant (and I felt odd) was the reviewer recommended using Kyrstal Klear (or equivalent) to represent the glazing in the lower windows in the grain elevator, as it is otherwise 'too hard' to put the usual plastic glazing into the windows. Since Walthers invariably includes plenty of plastic glazing with their building kits (enough at least for all the windows in the kit, and often a number of spare pieces), I found this review 'hint' to reek a bit of laziness and poor construction methods...
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Sir Ray wrote:

I agree. Windows in the photographs of that model looked...well... like someone used Krystal Klear on them. They all looked like little lenses.
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What made it hard to put the usual plastic glazing into the windows in that kit?
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Mark Mathu wrote:

Apparently it is difficult to access the inside of the building to install window glazing after assembly (at least the way the building was assembled by the reviewer).
Feb. 2007 Model Railroader Mag, pg 97.
Peteski
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On 10 Jan 2007 14:07:00 -0800, Peter W. wrote:

Sounds like a Darwin Diesel Award candidate.
--
Steve

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Steve Caple wrote:

Possibly... I suspect this is a case of not logically thinking through the assembly sequence. I have found that following the assembly instructions is not always the best way to assemble kits. Althought I haven't assembeld or even examined this kit, so I'm only speculating.
Peteski
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Peter W. spake thus:

Either not thinking through, or just blindly following the instructions for the kit, or being in a hurry.
It does take a bit of planning and care to install glazing while a kit is being built, but it can be done in all cases that I know of. The trick is the sequence of operations.
If you're going to paint the walls, you have to do that *before* you attach the glazing. (Unless you want painted-out windows.) Of course, painting is (usually) simpler when the structure is put together, meaning that you may have boxed yourself out of being able to install the glazing; I suspect this is what happened to the reviewer here. But you can paint the walls, attach the glazing, and then glue the walls together.
--
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You are correct about drying concave and being rather thin in the middle. I did try Elmer's glue and it worked great from a cohesive point of view. It dried flat and filled the window nicely. However, it was translucent. Maybe a combination of Elmer's and Microscale Krystal Klear might work. I'm going to give it a try. Thanks
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On Fri, 05 Jan 2007 11:17:01 -0500, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

You could go to a rock shop and get some mica. Works great. Looks just like glass that's been out in the weather and gotten a tiny bit dirty, dusty and a greasy. Crumble a sheet of it from a large, flat piece, cut it to fit and glue it in place. -- Ray
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Byron Lane wrote:

I have used Micro Kristal Klear from Microscale to make thin film windows on a Campbell structure that I'm building.
http://www.microscale.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=MI-9&Category_Code=FINPROD&Product_Count=3
I have to wonder if it's really a special formula. It looks an awful lot like standard white glue when put on, but it dries clear very similar to white glue. Makes me wonder if you could do the same thing with white glue.
--

Rick Jones
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Go over to a craft store and ask for "Gallery Glass" Crystal Clear, part number 16001. It may be the same as what Micro Mark sells under their name?
-- Phil Anderson Up hill slow, down hill fast, tonnage first, safety last.

http://www.microscale.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=MI -9&Category_Code=FINPROD&Product_Count=3
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