Vinyl tracks

How to glue tracks to road wheels? I am trying to glue Italiera tracks to
wheels so they look right. I have tried crazy glue but the slightest touch
breaks the hold. Thanks.
Gill
Reply to
GIvask
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Have you tried sewing them to the road wheels? I read that somewhere but have never tried it.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
using black thread does work. just tie a knot and then use CA on the knot.
Craig
Reply to
blakeec
There are several options:
a) use ACC glue as it is the only one that works well with painted wheels and tracks:
b) as noted sew them down (actually weaving the thread in and around the road wheels and through the tracks, either using the drive holes or between the track links;
c) use fine piano wire (as it is stiff enough) to hold the tracks down by drilling holes in the hull above the track run and then painting the metal parts the same color as the tracks (they are nearly invisible if done right).
d) get a set of single link tracks like Fruil model ones made out of metal, as they sag naturally.
Four options, your choice!
Cookie Sewell
Reply to
AMPSOne
Super glue.
Reply to
Al Superczynski
Yep, the Fruil tracks rock.
Reply to
Jim
In the days when I did a lot of armour, I found that white PVA glue worked very well for gluing tracks to the tops of the road wheels. It was usually necessary to hold it in position overnight and I used wedges of scrap balsa wood for this. White PVA is the water soluble glue often used in schools but I used one sold for woodworking. In the UK, it was sold as Evo-Stik Resin W but it's commonly available under many different brand names. It dries colourless. Models on which I used it thirty years ago show no deterioration of the glued join.
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin
Is is amber coloured like Gorilla glue? Now I want to try some... tia,
The Keeper (of too much crap!)
Reply to
Keeper
What interesting glues you have in America! I've never come across Gorilla glue, or crazy glue come to that.
PVA is a slightly milky white liquid. You will almost certainly have seen it even if you've never had a use for it. Places like craft shops and art suppliers sell it in big bottles and small children in school use it for collage. It seems to come in different strengths and the woodworking version that I used was probably stronger than the craft shop versions.
You can use some versions for glazing small window spaces in models in the same way as Crystal Clear which may be the same thing. I have sometimes used it to tack the parts of a plastic kit together to check the fit as they can be prised apart later without damage if you're careful. I used to glue canopies onto aircraft models with it to avoid fogging them but I now use Mek Pak as it gives a stronger joint. I've occasionaly used it as the basis of a home-made filler for metal models. Mixed with a fine powder to form a thin paste, it adhered well to white metal. There will be better fillers on the market now, though.
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin
Gorilla Glue is the brand name of the first commerically avilable polyurethane glue, it foams as it cures but is extremely strong and waterproof. Krazy Glue (note spelling) is the brand name of the most common (at first) CA glue.
Reply to
Ron
I see, it's usually sold under the brand name "Elmers" over here. Usefull stuff. Lemme see if I can find a small sample of Gorilla glue. Cheers,
The Keeper (of too much crap!)
Reply to
Keeper
I knew you'd have come across it!
I'm afraid the sample of Gorilla Glue would be wasted. My modelling activities are very basic nowadays and the only glues I use are Mek Pak and super glue. Thanks for the offer, though.
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin
Gorilla glue would be pretty useless for modelling anyway.
Reply to
Ron
Should be CAA, short for Cyanoacrylate. Super Glue GPO
Reply to
Lafimprov
Okay, I'll bite. Why would a polyurethane adhesive be useless for modeling? Would the foaming action melt the plastic? I'm thinking of gluing dissimilar materials.
While we're on the subject, what adhesive can we use for gluing the ancient acetate plastic car promos? tia,
The Keeper (of too much crap!)
Reply to
Keeper
It won't melt the plastic but you'll have to carve away all the foamed out glue and you must clamp the parts tightly for at least an hour. The required clamping pressure alone would distort or break plastic.
Watch crystal cement maybe, Duco or the tube type Ambroid.
Reply to
Ron
Acetone.
Reply to
Al Superczynski
Right you are! Went to the Gorilla glue site; looks great for woodworking but after doing a little homework there's very little it could do plasticwise. Between clamping and the expanding action of the glue the model would be useless. Plus you're supposed to dampen the mating surface before joining; that kind of excludes RC and rocketry as well. Cheers,
The Keeper (of too much crap!)
Reply to
Keeper
Back in the '70s it started to be called ACC in the model railroad mags. IIRC, it was supposed to be Alpha-cyanoacrylate glue. Coming into the '80s the ACC was discouraged editorially.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Mad-Modeller

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