New York (area) boxcab electrics

Firstly, let me say that I write as an Englishman, unfamiliar with US
railroads, so please forgive any obvious inaccuracies. Now, two
questions, really.
1) Looking at photos of, say, class T-1B, this seems to be a sixteen
wheeler, or 4-4-4-4 in steam terms (2-B-B-2?). The P-1a seems to be
4-6-6-4, using the same terminology. Question. What was the purpose of
the two four-wheeled bogies (trucks), which protrude from the front and
rear of the loco? They do not appear to be load bearing, as in steam
locos, and appear to have railings, as if for engineer or shunter use?
2) Was, or is, there a class of electric loco, possibly similar to the
above, with a (steam type) wheel arrangement of 4-6-4, preferably with
the six centre wheels coupled? New York area?
Thank you!
Reply to
Graeme
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The pilot trucks (in front) were used to help the locomotives ease into a turn smoother. The trailing truck (under the cab) were to help support longer fireboxes and the cab. They were somewhat load bearing, but since they were not powered, there was little weight on them.
Reply to
Frank A. Rosenbaum
If I'm remembering the correct locos, the front bogie (2') swivells on the Driver frame (B) which either swivells on the mainframe/body (2'B)'(B 2')' and is therefore a bogie on a bogie, or it's a double loco 2'B+B 2' (4-4+4-4). So the bogie leads the driver frame and wheels into curves. The European notation gives much more information in this case.
Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
I don't think there was ever a class like that, but I think one of the experimental designs for the Pennsylvania electrification was that way. I think it may have even had a GG1 style body on it rather than a boxcab.
Reply to
gl4316
The T-1b was a B-B+B-B. The two frames were articulated together, while the carbody rode on top, relieved of buff and draft forces. The leading and trailing bogies *were* load-bearing.
The railings are simply to protect the entryway into the loco cab and the area around the sandboxes, although no doubt shunters used them when required.
The nearest electric loco to your description is the PRR P-5a. I think they probably operated around New York. A Pennsy fan could give you a definitive answer on where they ran.
Cheers,
Mark.
Reply to
Mark Newton
The later P-5b locos had a GG-1 style body, the earlier P-5as were boxcabs. They were a production loco, not an experimental.
Reply to
Mark Newton
In message , Mark Newton writes
Fascinating. I see what you mean about the p-5b :
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A truncated GG1.
Reply to
Graeme
In message , Mark Newton writes
Oh, I see. Thank you.
Yes, understood.
Thanks to Mark, and everyone who commented. Very informative.
Reason for the last question was in connection with a loco I have, probably home made, brass boxcab body. We are talking pre war 0 gauge tinplate, not scale models. This particular loco uses a Lionel (steam) 0-6-0 chassis/motor, but seems to be missing something. I thought about adding two 4 wheeled trucks, but perhaps two 2 wheeled trucks would be better? The body is vaguely reminiscent of the NYC T-2a, but, being a toy train, I suppose I could get away with almost anything. However, I would quite like the finished loco to be based, however loosely, on a known prototype.
Reply to
Graeme
Graeme spake thus:
Yep.
Now, if I can try to steer this conversation a little more on-topic (re:models), and coincidentally towards one of *my* favorite locos: how about models of the Milwaukee bi-polars? Anyone familiar with these?
I've seen some in brass; very nice, but expen$ive. Did anyone ever make this in plastic? How about scratchbuilt models? (I'm thinking HO here, but info about any other scales welcome too.)
Reply to
David Nebenzahl
In message , David Nebenzahl writes
I'm not into modern 0 gauge, either three rail or scale, but have a vague feeling that MTH (Mike's Train House) have built a Milwaukee bi-polar.
Reply to
Graeme
The only Bi-Polar models I know of were in brass, Ho and O scale, by Custom Brass. To my knowledge ther has never been a plastic HO Bi-Polar.
But don't take my word for it, at least not without a large grain of salt.
Reply to
Mark Newton

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