Okay, first try at using Flickr:

As a test, here are a few photos I took at last month's operating
session at the San Diego Model Railroad Museum's San Diego & Arizone
Eastern layout, plus one of Port Macabre on my very incomplete home
layout as well. (Crosses fingers.)
formatting link

Now that I've figured out the aperature priority setting on the
camera, I should be able to get more depth of field next time...
~Pete
Reply to
Twibil
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Nice work! Thanks for sharing. I look forward to more photos.
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire
Reply to
vista bill
On 3/7/2009 3:46 PM Twibil spake thus:
Looks fine; you seem to have figured it out.
Suggestion: Post your pictures in such a way that the viewer can choose among several sizes, including the "original" (largest) size, so one can see them bigger. Typical "large" sizes are on the order of 1000 pixels on the largest side or more. Unfortunately, I don't know how to do this, but it can't be all that difficult, as I see lots of other stuff posted to Flickr this way. Anyone here know how to do this?
And if you ever post some pictures of that mile-and-a-half of parked power, I'll look forward to seeing them.
Reply to
David Nebenzahl
Thanx, Bill.
I'm new to digital photography and I'm a computer know-nothing to boot, so my pictures have nowhere to go but up...
~Pete
Reply to
Twibil
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For being new to digital photography, I think you're off to a good start. BTW, everyone starts as a computer know-nothing, Pete.
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire
Reply to
vista bill
Instructions: (A) Click on link above. (B) Click on the specific pic you want to see. (C) When pic comes up, click on little magnifying glass icon at upper left of picture that says "all sizes".
There was a link (not mine) in that thread that showed them, and it was a better pic than mine anyway.
~Pete
Reply to
Twibil
On 3/7/2009 7:13 PM Twibil spake thus:
'zactly right. I wrote that message because when I looked at the pics before, they didn't have that little magnifying glass thingie. They do now. No idea why.
Reply to
David Nebenzahl
Thank you.
At one time there were around 200 Steam Schooners working the west coast, and my dad shipped out on one in the 1920s. I built the Altair from photos he took while he was aboard her and also from my memories of a model he built of her in the 1940s for *his* model railroad. (The original model, alas, went missing during one of my mother's housecleaning purges while I was away at college in the 1960s. #%** +@**!!)
Steam schooners have great modeling potential if you want to model a west coast port, as they came in all sizes from less than 100 to over 300 feet, but were all similar in layout -and lasted into the 1950s in some cases. That means you can build one that fits your available space and that it won't look out of place on a late '40s/early 50s waterfront.
Altair is medium-sized at an HO scale 172' in length (23 1/2") and fits neatly into her 30"x9" slip. If you're really curious, I can take a couple of OT shots of her and post them on Flickr for you.
BTW: The last known example of a wooden-hulled steam schooner still exists, and is slowly rotting away in San Francisco Bay.
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~Pete
Reply to
Twibil
Thank you.
At one time there were around 200 Steam Schooners working the west coast, and my dad shipped out on one in the 1920s. I built the Altair from photos he took while he was aboard her and also from my memories of a model he built of her in the 1940s for *his* model railroad. (The original model, alas, went missing during one of my mother's housecleaning purges while I was away at college in the 1960s. #%** +@**!!)
================================================================ Great story. I've always had a liking for coasters. Ever seen pictures of Clyde Puffers or some of the coasters around the UK? A lot of character. ==================================================================
Steam schooners have great modeling potential if you want to model a west coast port, as they came in all sizes from less than 100 to over 300 feet, but were all similar in layout -and lasted into the 1950s in some cases. That means you can build one that fits your available space and that it won't look out of place on a late '40s/early 50s waterfront.
Altair is medium-sized at an HO scale 172' in length (23 1/2") and fits neatly into her 30"x9" slip. If you're really curious, I can take a couple of OT shots of her and post them on Flickr for you.
======================================================================== Please do. I enjoy seeing waterfront modelling. =====================================================================
BTW: The last known example of a wooden-hulled steam schooner still exists, and is slowly rotting away in San Francisco Bay.
formatting link
=================================================================================== Wow, I didn't know there used to be ship building in St. Helens! I'm sitting about 25 miles from there at this moment.
~Pete
Reply to
LD
Looks great - what did you use for the rigging, and where did you get what looks to be batter than usual scale-size hook?
Reply to
Steve Caple
Black nylon surgical thread. It doesn't develop that ugly and non- scale "fuzz" like many other types of thread. You can get it at surgical supply houses in various gauges.
I'm not sure what you're asking about, so I'll guess.
The anchors are just boat-model white-metal castings, and the only other hook I can think of is the one on the boom rigging.
It's an HO scale brass casting that was originally intended for modelling logging cable rigs, but it's so old I have *no* idea who made it or where I got it.
Sorry.
~Pete
Reply to
Twibil
Scratch. The model was built many years ago by a guy who -I am told- wasn't a model railroader. He was just fascinated by the big Goat Canyon trestle in Carrizo Gorge (see URL below) and decided to build a model of it. (I'm told the prototype is the largest/highest wooden trestle ever constructed in the U.S., and it's still standing and functional to this day; some 40 miles east of downtown San Diego.)
formatting link
Interesting bit of trestle trivia: rather than being built of balsa or commercial HO gauge timbers, the guy apparently cut up an old set of wooden Venitian blinds on his own table saw, and went from there. (!)
Years after he'd built it, the City of San Diego (Sandy Eggo to the locals) provided a building for the Model Railroad Museum, and somehow the trestle found it's way to the SD&AE club with the proviso that it be used on the layout. (We don't know what moved him to build it in HO scale in the first place, but we're glad he did.)
The only operational problem the trestle presents is that the rest of the model railroad has a minimum 48" radius but the trestle has a 36" radius curve right in the middle, and that occasionally causes derailments when long/heavy trains clothes-line the corner and portions of said trains drop precipitiously the 4' to the bottom of the gorge.
If you look at the picture again, you'll notice that several timbers have been recently replaced where they were snapped by falling cars (and locos) and have not yet been stained to match the rest of the timbers.
That's my job for this coming Saturday morning...
~Pete
Reply to
Twibil

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