Old MODEL RAILROADER magazines

Peek-a-boo, STEVE CAPLE, we see you!
Getting old Steve but I don't mind watching you try faking and failing Steve Caple.
On Feb 18, 8:33?pm, STEVE CAPLE> wrote:

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On Mon, 19 Feb 2007 11:17:47 GMT, Mark Newton wrote:

Curt modeled Hanes for his pastor from ages 9 to 17; then Rev Billy Bob gave him commando training.
--
Steve

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Again you slam god and the church. God is keeping score and hell is where you are bound.
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Styrene and other plastics also transmit light.
It's a bit of an annoyance to go through the trouble of putting lights inside buildings to create a "night time effect" only to have the light go right through the walls of the buildings.
--
-Glennl
The despammed service works OK, but unfortunately
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com spake thus:

I'd think that a shot of black paint would solve that problem quickly.
Unless you like that "X-ray" effect ... put some silhouettes inside the building ... couples preparing to get it on ... maybe some of that hootchy-cootchy Prieser stuff they were talking about in the other thread ... so why am I typing like Big John all of a sudden?
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

It does. Most illuminated structures will glow in the dark unless they have a good coat of paint on the interior. They also will leak light at the corners, at any joints, around the eaves. I've seen resin, styrene and wood structures looking like jack o lanterns after dark. You want to make sure the bulbs don't show thru the windows. I use a copper adhesive tape to run juice up to the ceiling. It sticks to the walls and prevents the "ratsnest" look that loose wire will give you.
David Starr

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David Nebenzahl wrote:
> OK, if I can steer this conversation away from a certain wanker and > back onto the topic of illustration board, might I ask you how, > specifically, you deal with the problem of warpage? Sealing sounds > like a good idea: do you do this before gluing stuff to the board, or > after? With what? And both sides, I assume, correct?
David, I've experimented with a number of products to find a suitable sealer. All have worked well enough that I would mention them to others.
I've used shellac, lacquer varnish, Future floor wax*, Derivan** artists medium, Krylon Matte Spray, even Dullcote. They can be applied either before or after assembly. If I'm using a water-based adhesive such as Willhold RC-56, which is a high-grade PVA that seems to be less "wet" than the noraml stuff, I seal after assembly. If I'm using a solvent adhesive such as Bostik, or hot-glue, I seal before assembly.
If I'm building a larger industrial structure, I also find that some internal bracing, in the form of floors and interior walls are helpful, as well as providing baffles for the interior lights.
Cheers,
Mark.
* Which I think is an acrylic varnish? ** An Australian brand.
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Mark Newton wrote: [...]

I often use triangular braces made by cutting corners off scrap bits and pieces. PVA works fine for this.
--
--
Wolf

"Don't believe everything you think." (Maxine)
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In a particular situation when I used very light balsa sheets to make something, I had the same problem. I simply glued a 1/4" square piece of balsa to the back of the sheet. This resulted in a fairly rigid piece of material as well as a flat piece of material. You could also use such things as popsicle sticks (from a craft store) or other such flat material.
--
-Glennl
The despammed service works OK, but unfortunately
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So... material like that used to make cereal boxes would be about right in your opinion? I've never really understood all of the different terms for stock. Perhaps it's second nature for a printer though.
dlm
wrote:

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Dan Merkel spake thus:

That would be chipboard, what most people would call "cardboard", but quite a bit thinner than the chipboard used in note pads, etc. I've used plenty of cereal-box chipboard to build stuff. It's not quite thick enough to make good walls, though. (You can get thick chipboard at any decent printing paper supply house.)
So you're interested in the terms for paper, eh? It's a jungle out there. Let's see; just for a small sample we have:
o Bond, aka writing paper (including the most familiar stuff, "office paper", which is (in the USA) 20 lb. bond). Comes in lots of finishes (smooth, vellum, laid, cambric, lines, etc.) and content (rag, recycled, speckles, etc.). Used mostly for letterhead & envelopes.
o "Offset", aka "book", used for the bodies of books. Can be uncoated, gloss coated or dull coated, smooth or vellum finished.
o Cover stock, which includes most papers thicker than either of the above: comes in various weights, including "double-thick"; again, several finishes, coated or uncoated.
o Kromekote, a specific variety of super-high-quality coated papers in book and cover weights. Instead of being measured in weight (per ream) as other papers, it's measured in "points" of thickness (e.g., 14-point).
o Kraft, the stuff paper bags are made of; there's a line of kraft papers used for printing called Carnival Kraft, comes in lots of colors.
o Tag, the stuff used for manila folders and such.
o Chipboard, as has been discussed. Not used for printing, but for making pads, stuffing boxes, etc.
And this is not to even mention all the exotic art papers available. If you ever get a chance to go to a Flax store, check out their paper stock. They've got everything from metallics to vinyl-coated to handmade stuff to you name it. I've also seen paper made from banana leaves and cocoa fibers (commercial stuff in sheets).
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I have been designing and building architectural scale models for over 35 years and most of my modeling has benn using paper as opposed to styrene or other plastics as the main structure of buildings, ect.
My main paper (cardboard) was and is Cresent Board. It is about 1/16th thick and has a fininshed white surface with a dark gray/black back.
Cresent Board can be cut and shaped using the common Exacto type blades or other similar cutting utensils.
This product can be purchased at most office supply stores and/or through the internet.
To make the finished product moisture-proof and non warping I painted both sides with a lacquer sanding sealer prior to assembly. This prevents moisture from invading any part of the finished product and the finished product will remain straight and true from that point on.
The Cresent board will accept any type of paint and/or adhesives.
As to lighting the interiors the Cresent Board will not allow light to show through.
The interior can be partitioned to allow only certain rooms/areas to be illuminated with individual lights.
Also, the 'paper' concept of model building leaves a more realistic (warmer) appearance to the final product as opposed to any type of plastic which leaves a less realistic (colder) version of the same product.
These observations are the results of my over 35 years of professional architectural scale model building of everything from shopping centers to private homes and condominums, ect. which also includes model railroading from the mid '50s to the present.
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Jack N spake thus:

Yes, commonly referred to as "illustration board" (or "mat board"). Don't ask the art-store clerk for "cardstock". Oh, and the brand is Crescent.

Yep, it's definitely great stuff to work with: yields smooth crisp cuts, plenty strong.

I'll have to try that next time. Makes sense.
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Jack N wrote:

Once I managed to score a big pack of matte board "centers", scrap left over from matting prints, for pennies. Makes fine structures, stiff, flat, takes paint well.
David Starr
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Post some pictures of 35 years worth of this work.

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A friend of mine used to tell me about using something he called latex cement. He said it didn't soak into paper and would not cause warping.
I've used Goo, but it stringy as all get out.
Rubber cement never seems to hold for me.
I wonder with something with minimal moisture might work like a glue stick. There isn't much moisture in them.
Any other suggestions?
dlm
wrote:

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Mark Newton wrote:

Depends on the use. Balsa is often preferred for making models of redwood and Sequoia trees because the coarse grain of balsa is a very good representative of the coarse bark of those trees.
--

Rick Jones
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Rick Jones wrote:

Now that's an interesting idea, and one I hadn't considered. That'll be a method I'll try in the future.
Cheers,
Mark.
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wrote:

I'm partial to any issue with an E. L. Moore article in it :-). His materials may be out of date (balsa and Bristol board) but the structures are great.
-----------------------------
That's why I'd like to look thorugh them too, but I don't really want to buy them then get rid of them later. I'd be itnerested in some of the older construction models as well, but would probably go crazy reading about the prices that some of today's kits sold for "back then."
dlm
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Dan Merkel wrote:

Not if you do some arithmetic with the wages earned back then. One of those Mantua die-cast locomotive kits cost a couple day's pay or more. Not cheap at all. Damned expensive in fact. That's why there was so much scratchbuilding.
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