Paint question....

Bought a spray can of Model Master stainless steel buffing metalizer
to coat a passenger car that I've stripped...
Two questions...
First, is it absolutely necessary that I buff this paint, or will it
come out looking reasonably good without the buffing?
Second, what's the best product or material to use for buffing if I do
go ahead with it?
The can says to refer to the Metalizer Instruction Booklet for
detailed instructions, but, of course, there wasn't such a booklet
available.
Many thanks,
Andy
Reply to
Andy
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Andy spake thus:
Figures, huh?
Generally speaking, anything that wants to be buffed wants a very soft, clean cloth to do the buffing. Something like an old, well-washed cotton t-shirt. *Not* a towel; too rough. Just make sure there's no dirt or other particles to cause scratching. (This from long experience buffing such things as newly-lacquered guitars, which are much more critical than your application.)
Reply to
David Nebenzahl
Spray Paint? That causes ozone holes and global warming! Why are you still using these horrid things. Please stop killing the planet.
-----
Steve
Reply to
SteveCaple
How about if I just use one n scale passenger car's worth? How much of the planet will that kill?
Perhaps I can just purchase some carbon credits from Al Gore. He seems to have plenty.
But thanks anyway for your answer to my initial question.
Andy
Reply to
Andy
Andy, Try the Testor's PDF at this link. They have a few lines about applying and buffing this paint starting on about the 4th page:
formatting link

HTH, Steve
Reply to
Stevert
About all I can do is point out that it likely depends a lot on the skill of the painter. I've given up trying to paint rolling stock as it isn't something I seem to be able to do well.
So, I think you would fist and foremost want to evaluate your own skills and past experiences at painting with other types of paint.
Reply to
gl4316
Thanks Mark. That's the information I was looking for.
So now I know that I'll have to buff it, and I have some ideas as to what to use to do so.
Thanks to all - except CovvTseTung, whose sophomoric comments seem to indicate that he's been working around volatile solvents for far too long.
Andy
Reply to
Andy
Andy, you will find it very useful to learn how to use your newsreader's filter tool. You can set the newsreader to block/mark as read/delete by subject line keywords and by sender's names (or parts of their names.) CTT is already on my senders filter, for example.
HTH
Reply to
Wolf
Since some of us can't killfile, and so get all the troll quotes as well, just to clear up any confusion for those who don't already know:
"Aerosol Spray Paints have not contained ozone depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) since 1978. Aerosol Spray Paints do not deplete the ozone layer."
So to the 'concerned trolls' we can safely say: DISMISSED!
Also, here's an interesting page (someone possibly copied from a Testor page) in regards to using Model Master paints (bottle, spray, airbrush) - you may have seen it already, but what the heck:
formatting link
Reply to
Sir Ray
If I recall, that Metalizer line of paint, after buffing, also needs a special protective clear sealer coat. It's been awhile but I think if left unsealed the paint will start to oxidize or something like that.
~Brad fd64
Reply to
flyingdragon64
Now I hadn't seen anything about that anywhere. I'll have to keep that in mind.
I probably would be giving it a coat of "something" anyway - to protect the decals after they've been applied. But thanks again for this suggestion.
Andy
Reply to
Andy
Andy spake thus:
And of course, you can test it out on something about the size and shape of your car before ruining it. But you already knew that.
Reply to
David Nebenzahl
Steve you are correct spray paint is killing the planet stop using it
On Mar 3, 2:58=EF=BF=BDpm,STEVE CAPLE
Reply to
curtmchere
Curt,
I've specifically tried to stay out of the fiasco that appears to be your life, at least as you live it through this group.
As has been pointed out in previous posts, there are no longer CFC's in spray paint. I'm not killing the planet.
In your case, however, I'd make an exception. If I could project precisely which small part of the planet I'd be killing, I'd certainly consider unleashing a few paint cans worth of CFC's. I would have to know, of course, exactly where you are.
Allow me to put this a different way. I asked a legitimate question. I received several legitimate answers. Neither I nor anyone else have need of any of your bullshit.
Andy
Reply to
Andy
Andy spake thus:
Just so's you know: "Curt"'s not really Curt. You're responding to a troll.
(And I'm not one to use that term loosely, as so many others do.)
Reply to
David Nebenzahl
There is more to pollution than CFCs. The air is shared you can't put a tent up over your house and not care about the rest of the world.
VOCs are in paint. Carbon is in the spray. You are using something killing the planet. That may not be nice to hear but it is true anyway.
Hide quoted text -
Reply to
curtmchere
"David" is really Steve Caple. He is a troll who relentlessly is hounding me hoping I go away But I wont sorry Steve.
Again you ruin a good thread with your flames and attacks and trolling, or try to anyway. so much for you 'solution' Mr Troll.
Reply to
curtmchere
That's right! Several models I did with buffing Metalizer turned to dull gray in three or four years -- even with a light coat of the sealer. The problem with using the sealer is that it degrades the shine. If you use enough to protect from oxidation you probably won't have any shine left. There are much better products for Natural Metal Finishes such as Alclad II, SnJ polishing powder and even an automotive touch-up paint from Pep Boys (Plasti-Kote Bumper Chrome). All of these finishes are a bit technique sensitive so some practice and testing is advised to assure you get the results you want. Done properly you can get a very realistic NMF.
J. Bright
Reply to
Jim Bright

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