Producing Scale Drawings On the Computer.

On Fri, 01 Aug 2003 19:35:13 -0400 (EDT), "Wolf Kirchmeir"


Yup
It's also useful when you are actually designing anything, rather than inputting date from another medium - drawing, scale, whatever. Plus correcting things - see below.

Serendipity to the rescue! I was given a copy of 3D RR Concept and Design by a friend who asked me to design a layout for him. No arguements about which is best, this or 3D Trainz or whatever, I wouldn't know, i've only ever used this one.
I first learned to use it to design layouts (gee whiz!!) but then I started using the drawing tools to design other things for the layout - double deck benchwork cross sections, etc. Since then I have used this for all sorts of stuff. Last job was to design a sub-woofer enclosure my son is building for his home theatre. This took a lot of corrections, etc, from drawing to drawing. Making corrections is MUCH, MUCH easier on CAD!!

And as per the story above re sub-woofer, the joinery works were much more appreciative of a neat, clearly laid out drawing done to scale!! To misquote Telly Savalas, "who loves it, baby!!"
Steve Newcastle NSW Oz
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Steve Magee wrote:

You're not wrong! Particularly if you are nine-tenths of the way towards completing a drawing, only to discover some new information that was previously unknown to you. Say, for example, features of the bogie tenders coupled beind a 19 class... <G!> I've scanned all my photos of that one at Thirlmere if you're interested, Steve.
All the best,
Mark.
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On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 23:15:43 +1000, Mark Newton

Oooooh, Mark, do you know what your temptation is doing to my On30 layout budget/funding??? I found myself intently studying some Waratah 7mm scale kits at Casula the other day, if I hadn't bought a sound decoder* for my On30 Shay the week before, I would have buckled. Now I have until Liverpool to save!
I shall contact you with my correct email address directly to your optusnet addy, if that's OK. Yes, I would damn well like those effing 19 class pix!!! :)
Steve Newcastle (well, Edgeworth, really)
* - sorry, forgot to omit all reference to DCC. Don't wish to offend an individual who sometimes posts here....
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On Fri, 1 Aug 2003 23:35:13 UTC, "Wolf Kirchmeir"

This comment is made so often that people believe it to be true. It is for beginners. For the experienced it is not. I can do a quick sketch in CAD faster than I can round up the drawing tools. When I finish a CAD drawing I know everything fits. Can't say the same for paper and pencil.

This is very true. I learned my drafting 50 years ago and thanked my lucky stars when computer aided drafting came along. Has anybody else drawn in ink on cloth? Anyway I started ahead and it still took me quite a while to get proficient but it was worth the effort, to me. When I supervised a group of engineers I convinced them to use a spread sheet for some of the data entry stuff we had to do. The first time around it took longer on the computer, the first revision was a breakeven and after that it was all gravy.
I have used Generic Cadd for years. Some years back I was offered AutoCad Lite at an attractive price. I bought it and discovered that I would have a whole new learning curve to traverse. Actually more like two since I would have to unlearn Generic. It also suffered from the Windows problem, so many bells and whistles that it was unneccesarily complex. I gave it away.
--
ernie fisch


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Mark Newton wrote:

I now use AutoCAD 2000. You can download some of my drawings in zipped dxf at http://hjem.get2net.dk/erik_olsen/tegn/tegn_dxf.htm (sorry, Danish text only).
--
Faihtfully
Erik Olsen
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Hello,
Virtually all the CAD work for my turnout assembly fixtures is done in full 3D modelling using SolidEDGE modelling software. Solid modelling is quickly replacing 2 dimentional CAD software in the manufacturing world. The diffenence between working with 3D over 2D is hard to overstate! When a 3D part model is coupled with a good CAM package, like Mastercam and a CNC mill/lathe, just about anything can be done. The learing curve for 3D drawing is steep, takes a good year to get onto to it, but the payoff if well worth it. I can draw at the same speed, of faster in 3D then I could in 2D.
I am in the process of drawing a substancial library of turnout templates which are available to download from my website,
http://www.handlaidtrack.com/tie-templates.html
All these drawings were produced from a full 3D model, actually when the working drawing is what you want, the 3D model is a by-product of this process. I found it hard to believe at first that this could be a more efficiant way of drawing but it is. Once the 3D model is made, the software will produce the working drawings from it, section views are as easy as placing the section line, the software will figure out the rest, hatching lines and all. So its starting to get to the point where you don't have to do the drawing!

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Absolutely! I used several tools, depending on what I'm doing. CADRail is a perfectly competent little CAD program for doing many things other than track planning. A product, like CADRail, that allows the use of protoype units of measure, then scales the printed output, is extremely useful. I print the output onto full page, removable adhesive stock, stick it to styrene of the appropriate gauge, and start cutting. I also use Adobe Illustrator and Paint Shop Pro for some things, but scaling is not quite as convenient in these kinds of tools. The advantage they have is that it is easier to create signs and interior partition details that can be printed and then directly incorporated into a building.
Mark Alan Miller
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Mark Alan Miller wrote:

Printing on adhesive paper is an interesting idea that I'll try. My new printer will handle thin styrene sheet, but for larger thicknesses, or sheet brass/NS, this sounds like the go.
Cheers,
Mark.
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Actually, I have four different Cad programs. I have Generic Cadd which I started on in the mid 80's and still have the latest version which was discontinued by Autodesk a few years back. I purchased Autocadd LT in 1998. I also have Autocadd 3D starting at 8.0 to Autocadd 2000. The 8.0 version came on 5 1/4 " floppies. Been a while.
I also have Chief Architect which is an application specific program for designing buildings. It does however, have some very limited Cad functions.It's great for doing model structure drawings. It has a huge library of windows ,doors etc that you can drop in the drawings. One of the best functions for modeling use is the ability to print out a model complete with assembly tabs in any scale you desire.I like to print models on light cardstock and glue then together and then place them on the layout to get an idea of what the finished product will look like. This is the software that I use more than all of the above.
Ken Day On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 04:09:20 +1000, Mark Newton

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Ken Day wrote:

Now that sounds interesting!
Mark.
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http://www.qualityplans.com/Chief_Architect.htm
Toward the bottom is the price, strap yourself to your chair:
CTucker NY
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wrote:

So assuming that one can afford the software does anyone have hints/suggestions on actually creating the drawings?
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Gerald Henriksen wrote:

First step is to decide what you want to draw!
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This entire book, all scale drawings, was done with Microsoft Visio: http://www.modelrailroadingmag.com/html/TracksidePenn.htm

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I use an AutoCAD clone available off the Internet called Intellicad. I've used AutoCAD and my opinion is IntelliCAD is actually easier to use. They claim that it can read and write .DWG files but I haven't actually checked that they are fully compatible with AutoCAD.
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