Proxxon FKS/E or Micro-Mark equivalent mini table saw

Referring to this table saw;
http://www.miniaturetree.com/imgcategory/257_b.jpg
Has anyone ever used this to cut aluminum say .1"" thick using the 24
teeth carbide blade or similar?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/29/2009 12:30 PM snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com spake thus:

Without having used it, I can tell you that it will work, although the cut may be a bit ragged. I have cut aluminum on a larger table saw with a carbide blade. Usually needs cleaning up afterwards.
In terms of smoothness of cut, the more teeth the better. You also might want to try a fine non-carbide blade (like one made for plywood).
--
Who needs a junta or a dictatorship when you have a Congress
blowing Wall Street, using the media as a condom?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agree. However, the 24 tooth (2.3 T/I) carbide is what the attached recommends for aluminum thicker than 1/16";
https://www.micromark.com/html_pages/instructions/80463i/arbor_saw.htm
I also asked Micro-Mark tech support what were their thoughts and they recommended the following abrasive cut off disk;
http://www.micromark.com/ABRASIVE-CUT-OFF-DISK-NON-FERROUS-3-1and4-DIA-10mm-HOLE,8115.html
My experience with abrasive disks for cutting has never been good. ISTR sparks flying, an obnoxious odor and the process taking forever.
I'm leaning towards the 168 tooth (17 T/I) jeweler's blade which is recommended for soft brass up to 1/8"...What do you think?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/30/2009 8:53 AM snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com spake thus: >
>

OK. I'd at least consider their recommendation.

http://www.micromark.com/ABRASIVE-CUT-OFF-DISK-NON-FERROUS-3-1and4-DIA-10mm-HOLE,8115.html
I wouldn't use an abrasive disk for cutting aluminum. Too soft, and leaves a *really* jagged edge. Works OK for ferrous metals.

Aluminum's softer than brass, or about as soft, so it *should* work. I'd try it, so long as the blade's not super-expensive.
--
Who needs a junta or a dictatorship when you have a Congress
blowing Wall Street, using the media as a condom?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually, it's $10.00 cheaper than the carbide blade. Thanks!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree with you Opar that the 168 tooth blade is the way to go. My father was an industrial arts teacher and I learned from him some 54 years ago. In the time since then I have cut all types of metals and woods and the rule has always been to use higher number of teeth per inch or centimeter, however you want to measure, if you want a fine cut. John Hubbard
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Got the machine and the 168T blade yesterday. It cut through the .1" alu like butter leaving a mirror looking finish as though it was milled. Exactly what I was looking for. BTW, for those in the USA, MIcro-Mark has a sale on the Proxxon FKS/E "clone" (doesn't look as impressive but made by Proxxon using same parts and spec) for $259.95, that's $90.00 off their usual price of $349.95. Even at $259.95 it's overpriced IMO but I needed something small, quiet, with variable speed and a finished cut.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The "rule of thumb" for sawing anything successfully is to have a minimum of 3 teeth cutting in the material at any given moment. Less teeth will cut, but extremely roughly with likely damage to the teeth and to the material. For 0.1" thick material you need 30 teeth per inch or more. I personally would have a go with a saw of 20 or more teeth per inch, but carefully.
Greg.P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

RPM should also be a factor when considering rotary saws. I'm able to rip 1/16" aluminum sheeting using a 7 T/I blade and the finish looks like a metal shear prtess was used. No sanding required. However, things start getting ragged when thickness approaches .1".

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd be most worried about the ability of the motor to drivve the blade. Also, usee a thin oil when cutting and the edge will be allot smoother than if cut dry. The blade will also not fill with aluminum and thus keep a better cutting.
-- Bob May
rmay at nethere.com http: slash /nav.to slash bobmay http: slash /bobmay dot astronomy.net
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I never cut dry, that's one sure way to wear out cutting tools fast as well. Always used a lube "crayon". Works well and less messy than oil.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/31/2009 5:00 AM snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com spake thus:

Ackshooly, no lube on a saw blade is going to do much good, as it's all gone after the first few hundred revolutions of the blade (unless one has a steady flow of oil or something). Oil *is* messy. No lubricant required for this sort of cutting.
--
Who needs a junta or a dictatorship when you have a Congress
blowing Wall Street, using the media as a condom?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can see you've never used a lube "crayon".

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/4/2009 4:43 PM snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com spake thus:

Well, I've used wax (candle wax) to lubricate all kinds of tools. But that lube isn't going to stay there forever; just saying that it gets worn off pretty quickly.
--
Who needs a junta or a dictatorship when you have a Congress
blowing Wall Street, using the media as a condom?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try this;
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31kw6Js%2BnCL._SL500_AA280_.jpg
Just touch it to the blade while spinning. Good for several cuts, just re-apply on the fly between cuts. Much better than oil.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.