Scaliing Track

I used to have a link to a web page that gave dimension scales for
ties and spacing. I can't find where I left it so my question is; is
there a rule of thumb for tie spacing? My rough guestimates suggests
spacing them 1.5 times the tie width.
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
Reply to
Dan
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It entirely depends on a whole series of factors: - rail weight. - axle load. - train weight per metre. - sleaper material. - sleeper size.
Here in New Zealand sleepers are 2' apart on mainlines and 2'6" apart on branchlines. (1960 standard) Sleepers are 7' x 8" x 5" Australian hardwood or 7' x 9" x 6" treated NZ pine. 3'6" gauge.
Greg.P. NZ
Reply to
Greg Procter
Wood ties (9" wide x 7" deep) are typically 24 ties per 39 feet of rail = 19.5"; modern concrete ties often go up to 24" spacing.
Reply to
Mark Mathu
A little more detail:
The ties transfer the load to the ballast and hence to the subgrade. Closer spacing, larger ties, and heavier rail mean heavier loads are possible. W W Hay's Railroad Engineering says that 19.5" spacing of 7"x9"x10ft ties is "current maximum", which I interpret to mean that heavy-duty mainlines may have closer spacing of thicker, wider, and longer ties.
Different railroads did depart from these practices. Spurs and yard-tracks usually have wider tie spacing, for example.
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
Good morning Dan;
If you're utilizing HO track, 1/16"x1/8"x1" spaced about 1/4" is pretty close. The 1" gives you a 7' tie length. Peco uses 1-1/8" long ties.
Cheers, John
Reply to
John Fraser
Erm, Peco's ties are scaled to British prototype, which is 8'6" more or less. In N.America, ties are about foot longer. So 1" ties would not look right. Use 1-1/4" long ties.
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
Actually I'm looking for spacing on 3/4" scale. I used to have a link to a site that gave hints for spacing and scaling. I'm primarily interested in accuracy for my display track. Running track won't have scale ties or spacing.
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
Reply to
Dan
Well, you've got your prototype measurements now, so just use your sliderule... ;-)
Are you building a live steam loop in your backyard, then?
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
Yes, a simple loop with a siding. No sense in building a loco and not letting her stretch. The running track will be aluminum, I'm cheap, and the display will be brass. I will display it in my old 40 gallon aquarium.
If I don't blow myself up with this one my next one will be 1.5" scale. I don't know what I'll build yet. If you have a deep seated need to buy me a Christmas present I'd like a Bigboy kit. The nice thing about being single is I can park it in the living room.
As for my slide rule, the ole Pickett® never need batteries.
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
Reply to
Dan
Cool!
Post pics on alt.binaries.pictures.rail when it's done.
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
How old is Hay's book?
Reply to
Mark Mathu
Search on 'hay railroad engineering." You'll find it online, all 700 pages of it.
FWIW, I found a website on current railroad engineering which stated that its manual was based on Hay's book and other sources. I found references to the book on other engineering sites, too.
I misinterpreted Hay: "current maximum" means I think that the quoted figures are for the heaviest track then built. That would have been PRR's track w/ 152lb rail, the heaviest ever used. Current maximum rail weight is 132lb IIRC.
'Course, you could go to a nearby track and do some measuring... ;-)
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
The railways get grumpy if you go sawing a yard of rail out of their mainline tracks in order to weigh it, even if you put it back neatly! ;-)))
Reply to
Greg Procter
Yeah, I've seen it. So enlighten me on the publishing date.
I've seen references to 1953, 1982 and 1988 -- not sure if those are all reprint dates or if 1953 was the publishing date.
Reply to
Mark Mathu
A quick check on Abebooks.com 1952 appears to be first edition 1982 is stated as second edition
prices from $64.95 to $478.78 Availible new as a print on demand book.
Howard
Reply to
Howard R Garner
Typical Main track 18", Bridge Decks can be closer often, 24" customer sidings and such. They get moved around over time quite a bit depending on the track condition and type.
Reply to
dw
That's just plain tacky of them. After all they weren't using it at the time you borrowed it and you did return it before they needed to use it again. Then again, some people would complain if you hanged them with a brand new rope.
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
Reply to
Dan
There is no need to do any cutting, there are nice embossed letters and numbers on the size of the rail, which tell you the weight, style, who made it, and the year and month they made it.
And you can go to LB Foster at
formatting link
and learn more about rail then you ever wanted. ;-)
-Hudson
Reply to
Hudson Leighton
When several dates are given, the later dates indicate revised editions.
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
If the book was published before 1953, then the former date was a revised edition also.
Reply to
Mark Mathu

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