Turnouts

Nah, hit the mushroom with his elbow!!! -- David J


and
workers),
you
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Daniel A. Mitchell spake thus:

Just for the sake of my ignorance (and possibly others), what is a stub switch? Can you point to any examples?
--
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Try Google images "stub switch" and it's amazing what you find.
<
http://www.trainweb.org/canadianrailways/nf/hunter/stub_switch_bonavista_nf_40lb_rail_82.jpg
-- Cheers
Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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Not to belabor this, but I am curious. Did the British or Australians, in the early days of their RRs, ever use stub switches? If so, were they called "points" even though they had none? And is a gauge separation or gauntlet track turnout with no movable points still called "points"? Geezer
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Geezer wrote:

AFAIK "points" was the model railway term as used in model railway catalogues after WWII. (I don't know about pre WWII as I wasn't around then)
Greg.P.
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Geezer
I guess I have partially answered my own question - after pressing "Send" I remembered an old book I was given as a child. It is "Early Railroad Days - Prints from the Collection of American Steel Foundries" (this company sought out 19th century original lithographs to use on their annual advertising calendars, and late in or just after WWII issued a 'coffee table' book with perhaps 4 dozen color reproductions of these old prints). One of the prints circa 1839 is titled "Entrance to Locomotive Engine House Camden Town" which shows an early British 2-2-0 leaving the engine house and approaching a stub-type switch. What is unusual is that the rod from the switch stand clearly connects to the 4 rails leading to the frog, rather than to the two rails approaching the turnout as in a typical U.S. stub switch. This could be an error by the artist, except that he also detailed the foundations upon which the four rail assembly could slide from side to side, the tie rods between the 4 rails to keep them in gauge, and the chairs that rigidly mount the 2 approach rails to their sleepers. Geezer
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Geezer wrote:
> message > >> and being an Aussie/British modeller, I call them points >> > Not to belabor this, but I am curious. Did the British or > Australians, in the early days of their RRs, ever use stub switches?
I don't know about the UK, but there were small numbers of stub switches used very early on in Australia. What they were called I have no idea!
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"Geezer"

No UK passenger carrying line used stub switches, they'd be "illegal".
"Gantlet" with no points doesn't have a name 'cause it's not a switch(point).
-- Cheers
Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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OK, I have read most of the replies and there was really no reason to.
{we use switch and turnout interchangeably} The difference between a Snap Switch and a #4 switch is: A snap switch will take the place of an 18 inch radius curve and a 9 " straight section. A # 4 switch does not. I don't know what it works out to, but a #4 is straight when it comes off the frog. (the frog is the V where the wheel will cross over the opposite track.)
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It was explained in the model press many years ago that switches are to be called turnouts so they wouldn't be confused with the toggle switches used to control them.
-- Phil Anderson Up hill slow, down hill fast, tonnage first, safety last.

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On Fri, 24 Feb 2006 21:32:15 -0700, Arizona Rock & Mineral Co. wrote:

Given a half-a$$ decent writer of English sentences (yeah, I know, not somethinc that's exactly thick on the ground these days), and a reader with an IQ (and yeah, I know, it's a seriously flawed measure, just go with the basic idea) above 90, it should almost always be possible to tell from context what sort of switch was meant. And if there appears to ba a good chance of confusion, it's teh writer's job to fix it.
--
Steve

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On Sat, 25 Feb 2006 02:06:29 -0800, Steve Caple wrote:

By way of illustration, even late night typos are easily interpreted in context <g>
--
Steve

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