Engine ID

Think about a 1925-ish, 4-cylinder, OHV, 2-main bearing crankshaft engine, with the spark plugs laying horizontally into the head, under the inlet manifold.

Fixed starting handle, Magneto igntion, dynamo and starter by Lucas.

Cast iron block and head but Ali casting for crankcase and bell housing.

Water pump driven off the timing case and located in front of the case, not on the engine side, the same drive for the magneto is used for the water pump.

Dynamo also driven off the timing case, no belt. There was a belt-driven fan on a fairly long support shaft.

Any ideas what it is? I keep thinking early Singer but probably wrong.

Peter

-- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Rushden, UK snipped-for-privacy@prepair.co.uk

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Reply to
Peter A Forbes
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Austin Ruby

Reply to
Guy Fawkes

Sorry for the rather short sharp reply (it was getting late) but AFAIK the Austin Ruby used the same side valve engine as the rest of the Seven range.

Any chance of a pic Peter? I'm thinking continental voiturette engine - something like Scap Cime or (coincidentally) Ruby, though the Lucas electrical gear is a bit of a puzzle so perhaps you are right with Singer.

NHH

Reply to
Nick H

I'm pretty sure it isn't one of the regular volume makers in the UK, and the style of dynamo/magneto drive isn't that of a cheap car.

Look on Smokstak:

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Pictures aren't that good, but will give you a better idea.

Peter

-- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Rushden, UK snipped-for-privacy@prepair.co.uk

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Reply to
Peter A Forbes

I'm sticking with my voiturette hunch! They might have grown up from cyclecars but some of these little frogs were beautifully engineered - think Salmson, Amilcar etc. I believe those two made their own engines but many of the lesser marques like Sandford, Rally and Derby used bought in units. I hoped Nick Baldwin's book on propretary vehicle engines might help, but apart from confirming that the firms I mentioned in my previous post were in that market, nothing very useful.

Google image search ("moteur cime" etc) gets some pretty interesting hits, including a good few from this merry sounding bunch

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thread "Moteur de cyclecar et voiturette" has plenty of pics, but of course none of them is quite right! The most promising is perhaps Ruby which at least looks like it might have come from the same factory, particularly the blown type K which has a similar deep crankcase and forward mounting of the water pump.

NHH

Reply to
Nick H

BTW. Googling "Singer engine" came up with this:-

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NHH

Reply to
Nick H

Dunno guv. Might it be a marine engine?

regards,

Kim

Reply to
kimsiddorn

I wondered about that, there are some 'marine' aspects to it, but the apparent dry plate clutch, output coupling looks as though it's for a fabric disc, and radiator fan shaft all seem to rule that out.

Tim

Reply to
Tim L

The spark plugs should be a clincher for an ID, but I cannot seem to find anything similar. Most of my old books are in storage until we get the top florr internals rebuilt, so I haven't any access to 'paper' reading.

Peter

-- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk

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Reply to
Peter A Forbes

snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.ukhttp://www.oldengine.org/members/dieselhttp://www.stationary-engine.co.ukhttp://www.oldengine.co.uk having looked at the pictures..... complete blank.

doesn't strike me as a traction engine though, mebbe marine, mebbe prime mover

Reply to
Guy Fawkes

With the fixed starting handle, water pump style, the wide positioning of the engine mounts, fan position, shape/style of gear box (surely not auto?), beefy starter motor, and drive out of gearbox, sump style, my money is on plant /machinery usage. When most small car engines of that time were still on thermo-syphon, that style pump surely says industrial use. The engine mounts are all forward of the bell housing leaving the gearbox to be easily removed for clutch access without further support of the engine and is of typical plant layout. To me it has been built with repair in situ in mind.

Regards, Dave Carter.

Reply to
D.J.Carter

Had a nice email from Eric Brain, he suggests that we look at the 'Gwynne 8' or 'Gwynne Eight'.

Peter

-- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Rushden, UK snipped-for-privacy@prepair.co.uk

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Reply to
Peter A Forbes

Nick Baldwin's A-Z of cars of the 1920's tells me that the Gwynne wore its gearbox amidships, separate from the engine, and the pictures show a pretty lofty prow which probably would not have warranted a coolant pump at that time (though a 'Brooklands' model is mentioned which perhaps featured a more sporty bonnet line).

NHH

Reply to
NHH

There's a Kohler generator plant in this month's SEM which has the plugs in horizontally below the inlet manifold. Don't know if they made vehicle power plants, or if it may just be a guide towards American manufacture?

Regards Dan

Reply to
Dan Howden

I'll ask Martin P to bring his copy over on Monday...

Peter

-- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk

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Reply to
Peter A Forbes

- and what a very nice unit it is too! I liked the article, good text & excellent photos,

My "History of ABC stationary engines" article (5,600+ words & 56 photos has been accepted for SEM, probably to run over three editions. Dunno when..........

Regards,

Kim

Reply to
kimsiddorn

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