2-6-2 Triang

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"Barbara Mitchell" wrote
With some difficulty - these are pretty uncommon models these days, many having been purchased over the years for just the purpose that you seek one.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
He hasn't said what kit. But there are two problems:
In those days white metal kits were designed to compromise to fit RTR chassis. So even if he gets a chassis that matches the prototype's wheelbase and spacing it might still not fit.
For example back in my OO days my white metal Saint was on a B12 chassis - and the footplate had the splashers positioned for that, not in the correct place.
Reply to
Christopher A.Lee
ISTR that it was also used for a Loco that was of a generic continental appearance . Later ones had red wheels and frames. G.Harman
Reply to
oldship
Triang's concept of "Continental" was a bit vague! The body was a bit like a French 2-8-2t but there were very few European Locos with widely spaced driving wheels in the manner of British Locos. The red chassis/wheels version was probably intended to give the impression of a German loco, but to a German it would look like a British loco gone a bit astray.
Greg.P. NZ
Reply to
Greg Procter
Hi Roger
Perhaps an indication of exactly what kit you are building, might assist someone to advise/supply you. Perhaps there is a more modern alternative, as a Tri-ang one must be 30 plus years old.
Then again you could be asking for a TT chassis ;-) So far the assumption has been made that you are looking for a OO 2-6-2T chassis, but that may not be true.
Kevin Martin
Reply to
Kevin Martin
wrote
Not 100% sure on this, but I believe R653 used different tooling, but utilised the R59 2-6-2T chassis.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
The Prussian P8 4-6-0 has always caught my eye, a contemporary of the GW "Star" I have often wondered how it compared in performance.... could be like a late Gresley B17
David
Reply to
chorleydnc
My books are packed away until the new house is built (about April/May) Ask me then and I'll find my data. I don't think they were built to be show-stoppers/race-horses, but they were good enough to hang around in service for 70 years!
Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
Kevin. Thank you for your interest. The kit I have is an old Wills Finecasr LMS Mogul Crab, & the chassis required is the one from the old Triang R59 tank engine. The rear pony truck is removed & the chassis is shortened some what to give the Mogul 2-6-0 wheel arrangement. Roger.
Reply to
Barbara Mitchell
OK, I thought that might be the case. But I wonder why you would bother, that particular kit I believe is quite old & was distorted to fit the Tri-ang chassis. So unless you have particular reason to build it (sentimental or as part of the history of the Wills range, for instance). I would go out and buy the Bachmann model personally.
But good luck with your project, assuming you decide to continue and can find a donor chassis. There must of been thousands made.
Kevin Martin
Reply to
Kevin Martin
Like most Prussian engines, the P8 was deliberately tuned down in performance to keep running costs low. Performance would have been around the level of contemporary British 4-4-0s, not 4-6-0s - think NER Rs (D20s) or L&NW George 5s, but with much lower maintainance costs.
This was an approach which could have been adopted in Britain to advantage, but would have required better co-ordination between loco- and civils departments than ever happened here. The only example in Britain that I can think of were the Caledonian '60' class, built in some numbers by the LM&S on the grounds that low running costs more than offset their sluggishness.
Reply to
Andrew Robert Breen

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