Happy birthday to me.

Hi All,
Reached my 48th year today (me now being 47) and apart from some Plymouth
Argyle bits and bobs and two books "Railway Operation for the Modeller" and
"Steam Around Plymouth" I received £200.
Suggestions on how to spend it please (no beer or food as I'm on a diet), No
Loconotives as I have not got enough room for those I have, No Coaching
stock as I have now have more than I need, and apart from a couple of
Bachmann Cattle wagons I do not need any other wagons.
Eddie
Reply to
Eddie Bray
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Hi Robert,
Already got a Lenz Set100 and also a ZTC 511,
Good try though. DCC is definetely the way to go.
Eddie.
Reply to
Eddie Bray
Eddie,
How about a computer interface to DCC such as the Lenz USB adaptor? Get your points operable by DCC and then explore the possibilities of running your layout from a computer.
Ashley.
Reply to
Ashley Sanders
Thanks for the suggestion Ashley,
I had thought about using a computer for running my system but, kind of like the idea of running the points from a control panel (more like a signal box), and just running the trains and any accessory decoders (if I fit any).
As the layout will be in the loft and I do not expect to have many visitors, I want to "play trains", if I wanted to run them from a computer I do not see how different that would be to using Hornby's Virtual Railway, other than considerably more expensive and time consuming to set up.
I believe that whilst we should utilise new technology where it is of benefit, but think at times we are going way over the top, after all how many computers were there in the 1960s or even the 1930/40s running the railway, still each to their own.
Eddie.
Reply to
Eddie Bray
Eddie
Using a computer is not synonymous to complete automation. Thinking about this and about running my model railways, I make a distinction between running a train (being the driver), setting the points and signals (being a signalman) and safety (making sure trains do not run into each other). Automation means that all of this is done by a computer and you just sit back and relax. You can also decide that you want to run a train or all the trains while you let the computer take care of signalling etc and safety. One scenario is that you do the shunting while the computer does the mainline trains. You can also decide to be the signalman with the computer operating the trains according to how you set the routes. You can also let the computer just take care of safety. If you link up your control panel through your digital system with the computer (this is actually very easy if you now how), you can program the interlocking in the computer, or route setting, etc. You can also program automatic shut downs or emergency braking when trains are trying to take the same route or run through a red signal. A lot of the things that are part of the electronic hardware of a layout (stop sections and signal setting using relays, diode matrices for setting routes, etc) can be replaced by software in a computer by just linking everything op through decoders with your digital systems and a computer interface. One big advantage is, that if you want to change something, it is a matter of reprogramming the computer than taking out the soldering iron a rewire the layout.
Reply to
Jim Northolland
Your comments summarise as: the computer's natural application in model railroading is simulation. Agreed.
For example, the computer/DCC combination allows a very close to prototypical modelling of Centralized Traffic Control and/or N. American style Dispatching. In any context, it allows very close modelling of classification (marshalling) yards. I've seen and briefly played with one such installation, and thought anyone who wants protypical operation should at least investigate it. (Unfortunately, thw layout in questiuon was never finished, as its owner changed jobs and locations.)
HTH
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
Hi Wolf,
Maybe in the last 30 years, but I doubt not prior to 1966.
As I am modelling a smallish through station, with a branch line off to a quay based in the early 60s I do not see an awful lot of potential for computer operation.
Eddie
Reply to
Eddie Bray
Eddie, following this thread you would appear to have all you require in the railway modelling area. Might I suggest that in line with your diet you might buy a bike with your 200BP & explore the country-side. :-)
Norman
Reply to
Norman
You are a funny man. :o)
True, I do need to get out more, but unfortunately I have not been into model railways long enough yet to have earned my anorak.
Eddie.
Reply to
Eddie Bray

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