Hornby curved points radius?

Am I correct in thinking the inner rail is second radius and the outer rail
is third radius? I ask because the leaflet I've got from Hornby says they
are both the same radius.
(kim)
Reply to
kim
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According to the illustration of their TrakMat, it doesn't match the curve of the 'large radius' platform section as supplied with the Country Station but it does seem to mirror the third radius curve at the other end of the TrakMat. It also begs the question of why Hornby doesn't yet offer a third radius platform section.
(kim)
Reply to
kim
That would imply a *very* sharp curve to create the angle.
Think about it, or look at the picture on the Hattons web site (unless you stock them and can check). The two radii of a curved point cannot be the same unless it is also a Y point.
MBQ.
Reply to
manatbandq
Not necessarily with points as modelled by Hornby et al. The fixed rails of the two curves could be the same constant radius, but the blades supply the transition.
R.
Reply to
Richard
On Hornby (and Peco Setrack) curved points, both arms are second radius. An illustration on the Hornby package shows how they fit with other track. The inner arm is a 33.75 degree curve, while the outer arm is a 67mm straight section and a 22.5 degree curve (a single curved track is 22.5 degrees). If you add 2nd radius curves to both arms to make a 90 degree turn, the tracks will be at standard Hornby/Peco 67mm spacing. I have them connected in 3's to form a curved transition from 2 to 3 tracks (using flex track to bring the track spacing to 50mm). I could post a link to a photo if anyone is interested.
(Shame on John for not knowing about what he sells!!)
Reply to
MartinS
I submit that on or about Wed, 20 Jul 2005 12:26:54 +0100, the person known to the court as "John Turner" made a statement ( in Your Honour's bundle) to the following effect:
I think you're right, but I have some Peco curved express points which are third radius and bigger-than-third.
Guy --
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"To every complex problem there is a solution which is simple, neat and wrong" - HL Mencken
Reply to
Just zis Guy, you know?
"Just zis Guy, you know?" wrote
I think those are combined 36" and 24" radius.
There were also some setrack curved points produced before the current issue. These were much tigher than the present models are were excellent for derailing locos! ;-)
John.
Reply to
John Turner
* Those are the Peco Streamline curved points.
I have a number of the old Peco Setrack 1st radius curved points in my fiddle yard, where space is at a premium. If they're carefully installed and negotiated slowly, my locos and rolling stock don't (usually) derail, even the current Hornby Black 5 with its fully-flanged centre driving and tender wheels. (I don't know how an 8F would manage.)
Reply to
MartinS
I submit that on or about Thu, 21 Jul 2005 00:34:09 +0100, the person known to the court as "John Turner" made a statement ( in Your Honour's bundle) to the following effect:
Ah yes, I have some of those :-)
Guy --
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"To every complex problem there is a solution which is simple, neat and wrong" - HL Mencken
Reply to
Just zis Guy, you know?
I submit that on or about Wed, 20 Jul 2005 23:25:27 -0400, the person known to the court as MartinS made a statement ( in Your Honour's bundle) to the following effect:
OK, usually. the N2 always comes off, though, as does the A3. Bah!
Guy --
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"To every complex problem there is a solution which is simple, neat and wrong" - HL Mencken
Reply to
Just zis Guy, you know?

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