Layout ideas... help!!!

Dear all
I am in the process of building my terminus area. Behind the terminus along
a long wall I intend to have a high street that is raised higher than the
tracks, but with a hill running down into the station area. I am using
Metcalfe half relief shops.
Question is: how would you place shops on a hill? Obviously they must be
level so they could be "stepped up" while the road rises up its gradient.
I have searched for pics on the internet but not turned up much. Anyone have
any ideas or links for pics
All help gratefully received
Rob
Reply to
Rob
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Build them like you would in real life. The foundations must be level so that the buildings are level. Thick card can easily be used to make a strip which is sits on the hill at the bottom and then has the 'steps' cut into the top, with a few vertical strips running from the long strip to the wall you will form a framework, there should be enough support for the shop buildings with just the frame. If you find it easier, glue other flat bits of card onto the framework so the buildings will sit on the flat card rather than having to be balanced on the ends of the card framework.
Luke
Reply to
Luke Briner
It's a little difficult from this distance as NZ and UK shops differ in construction. One point which would appear obvious to me is that the entrance door is going to be at the uphill end so that the minimum number of steps would be required. The steps would have to be built on the property owner's land so if they were of any size either the building would have to be back by the size of the steps or the steps would need to be inside.
Regards, Greg.P. NZ.
Reply to
Greg.P.
Try looking for the town of Lewes in sussex, any pics of there will show you exactly what you want to see. That or look at tourist photo albums of places, try the library. Sorry I can't point to more online, but I can't find any with a quick look either.
-- estarriol
Reply to
The shuffling Shambling Zombiefied corpse of estarriol
Or Howarth...
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Reply to
Darren J Longhorn
Great. Thanks guys Rob
Reply to
Rob
In message , Greg.P. may have written...
Greg, One of (if not the) the worlds steepest streets is in Lyttelton, aint it? Seem to have a vague memory of trying to descend it towards 'The British' and then the docks in a state of advanced inebriation....
Reply to
James Christie
Have a look at Baldwin St in Dunedin. :)
Cheers David
Reply to
David Bromage
You've decended it while inebriated - I'm impressed! Did you do it on your feet? It's lost that claim to fame because there is a steeper on in Dunedin, but that one doesn't have a pub. I lived in one approaching that steep in Wellington - I remember jacking up my car from the curb side to fix a puncture. It seemed to be taking ages to jack up and I glanced under the car - the other side was 6 inches off the road!!!
Lots of our early towns/cities were drawn up in England by architects who had no concept of how lumpy NZ topography can be. The nearby town of Collingwood was intended to be the capital at one stage so a nice grid plan was drawn - one street has a 100 foot drop half way along.
Greg.P. NZ.
Reply to
Greg.P.
In message , David Bromage may have written...
I've been to Dunedin, and was quite impressed. We spent a lot our time in the pubs around 'the octagon' square type place, I forget its real name. One of the most Scottish places I found in NZ and loved it, only there for 2 days then off to Brizzy and then home.
Reply to
James Christie
In message , Greg.P. may have written...
Ah, Lyttelton, lovely wee place, was there twice, when I was there the first time I stayed in Christchurch, then went through the tunnel to join a ship. Was that knackered after the flight from the UK that I didn't last long before I was dead to the world. The pub in question before the British was the imaginatively titled 'Irish Bar', and we managed to have a lock in there, the barman/owner was pretty pissed every time I went in there, but great times! Will never forget it.
Reply to
James Christie
They're always pissed in there - but you're not really pissed until you don't notice the hill!
Reply to
Greg.P.
The south island of New Zealand has more pipe bands per capita than Scotland! Dunedin is the old Celtic word for Edinburgh. Even the Dunedin railway station looks vaguely NBR-ish.
Cheers David
Reply to
David Bromage
"The Octagon".
I was brought up in Dunedin.
Reply to
Greg.P.
Or, even better, Haworth - not Howarth or Haworrth.
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Do a Google image search for more.
Reply to
MartinS
Scotland actually moved here in the 1850s - that's just a cardboard replica left behind to fool the English!
Greg.P. (whose ancestors escaped from Bradford)
Reply to
Greg.P.
Thankyou, Spike. :)
Cheers David
Reply to
David Bromage
In message , David Bromage may have written...
They must have used an anglicised version, as the Gaelic for Edinburgh is Dun Eideann.
Reply to
James Christie
No-one could spell in 1850!
Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg.P.
Doh!
Reply to
Darren J Longhorn

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