Motorising the Dapol Railbus

Hi all,

Been doing a little kit building recently, and just finished the rather nice model of the dapol railbus. However, I now want to make it move under it's own power.

Any recommendations about chassis/motors?

Ian

Reply to
Ian Cornish
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I think Branch lines do a Chassis kit

Reply to
Trev

I think you'd do a lot better with the Branchlines chassis kit. Good quality etchings, goes together easily. Be aware, though, that the finished article is rather lacking in adhesive weight. No website, but can be contacted via snipped-for-privacy@branchlines.com

TOS

ps there's also a nice etched interior kit (although it's easier to fit before the body is complete)

Reply to
The Old Salt

Branchlines do a fairly decent kit for it. Its easier if you've not built the railbus first, as you have to hack a few things out of the floor to fit it. However, the body kits are very cheap, so do another :-) (I think I have three kits, only one motorised)

The Branchlines mechanism is driven onto one axle only, the other being on a simple pivot to give compensation. Pickup is wiper wires onto each wheel (fit DIY bus-bars from bits of printed circuit board, such as sleeper strip). Mine is built to Scalefour Soc standards, but it can be built to OO or EM just as easily.

Optional interior kit from Branchlines as well - seats, cab partitions, control panel, etc.

Both make up fine, fit, and work well. Resulting railbus is a little noisy (due to motor echoing in the plastic body shell), though could be quietened down with some thinking about it all. Were I to do another, I'd sacrifice a bit more of the interior detail and fit the optional flywheel to the motor.

- Nigel

Reply to
Nigel Cliffe

I already have the branchlines interior kit, and picked up the motor chassis too, though when I test ran the motor chassis, I was very disappointed by the noise (it woke my daughter up, and she sleeps like a log). I suppose boxing in the motor on all sides could help, but where would I put the weight (and how much is needed). Any thoughts on making this model run quietly ?

Maybe, I'll get another kit, and ground this one somewhere on the layout... might make a good cafeteria at the station :-)

Reply to
Ian Cornish

I think the noise is from one source, and then amplified by two factors.

The noise comes from the worm and worm wheel mesh. So, cleaning up the wormwheel helps a bit. Possibly swapping the gears for different ones could help.

The amplification seems to be two places; the flat metal plate of the chassis which links the front to rear wheels. That can resonate nicely ! And, the boxy plastic body, which catches all the sound.

Writing this, I'm starting to wonder if some form of cushion mounting between chassis and body might help - even the smallest amount of bath sealant ? But that's a guess which someone else will have to take the risk on.

Today's modelling: get the 2mm scale Wisbech coaches soldered up. One was built two years ago, but the other 4 wheeler and the bogie coach are still to do.

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- Nigel

Reply to
Nigel Cliffe

the worm and gear wheel are brandnew!

Yep.

I might be willing to give something like that a try, if nothing else to hide the weight I'm going to have to squeeze in there.

Reply to
Ian Cornish

Doesn't mean that they are not the source of noise. I regularly clean up brand new gears, including those from makers with high prices and good reputations.

Worm wheels in particular can have bits of fine surface marking, burrs, etc. These are really small (doubt you'll see them with naked eye, even with super good eyesight).

Clean gears with a very fine file (edges where teeth meet the front face) and very fine wet&dry papers on the teeth themselves.

- Nigel

Reply to
Nigel Cliffe

On 25/02/2006 21:25, Ian Cornish said,

I have done one using the Branchlines chassis kit, but I wasn't entirely happy with it. It is in the queue for rebuilding, and I thought I might try something like the High Level Kits Pacemaker chassis. I haven't checked the practicality of this yet, mind!

Reply to
Paul Boyd

New gear sets usually have small burrs and very sharp edges.

An old dodge is to run the gears without lubrication, but with some traditional abrasive toothpaste instead. Give this a few minutes, then strip down and clean. On reassembly, noise should be greatly reduced.

Reply to
Tim Christian

Commenting on the noiseness of the motorised Dapol railbus, whilst I've never seen or heard an actual bus running, I suspect that they would have been rather noisy in full size. So, perhaps the noiseness adds to their realism. And with regard to their lack of adhesive weight, as long as they can move themselves along your layout, surely that's all that one wants. Regards, Bill.

Reply to
William Pearce

On 27/02/2006 11:31, William Pearce said,

...and for it to move realistically, under control, with realistic top speeds. Hence my thoughts about the High Level Kits chassis - 48:1 gearing.

Reply to
Paul Boyd

Use DCC.

Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir

In message , William Pearce writes

Just think of all that money you're saving not installing a sound chip into one :-)

Reply to
Jane Sullivan

The Keighley & Worth Valley Railway has two railbuses, and a 2-car DMU.

The noise of the Lima Cl 101 is quite realistic, apart from the lack of manual gear changes. The 101's tachometer had two pointers on it to indicate to the driver when to shift gears up or down.

Reply to
MartinS

Wolf Kirchmeir said the following on 27/02/2006 18:40:

A High Level Kits chassis is a darn sight cheaper than DCC! (Not that I'm against DCC by any means, I just can't afford it.)

Reply to
Paul Boyd

The bath sealant solution is recommended by DC Kits for their 144 kit - resin body/flat brass chassis. It works very well.

Cheers, Mick

Reply to
Mick Bryan

"William Pearce"wrote in

There's a reasonable amount of shrouding provided by the Railbus chassis mouldings to conceal a bit of lead glued under the floorpan. If the interior kit hasn't yet been fitted, an elegant way to weight it is to replace plastic seat squabs with lead ones, or glue the lead under the seat, and/or put whitemetal figures inside instead of plastic ones. This also works well in coaches and DMUs, with the advantage of the weight being pretty evenly distributed (though care advised with side-corridor stock, obviously... or it'll capsize...)

Mass might also damp out the worst of the noise, and a layer of felt glued inside the roof panel will cut down high pitched buzz. But if it's that obtrusive, suspect a poor gear mesh (adjust and run in with lubricant) or a mistreated nose bearing on the motor because of tight mesh or whip on the driving shaft, which requires a bit more action (like an outrigger bearing and/or the worm being moved up closer to the motor nose). Iain Rice's excellent book on chassis construction (by Wild Swan) has loads of illustrated hints on solving motor and drive rattle problems.

Tony Clarke (also with a Railbus to motorise though minimal prototype excuse to run the Park Royal version)

Reply to
Tony Clarke

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