Operating lights

I have acquired an Express Models lighting kit for my Class 24 diesel.
They recommend wiring it so that all four sets of lights can be operated
independently, rather than using the decoders direction control. My
question is why? Would the prototype ever have both sets of tail lights
on or both sets of 'code' lights (or whatever they are supposed to be
called). Which combinations correspond to a realistic operation?
Mark Thornton
Reply to
Mark Thornton
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When those lights were used the white lights were used on the front of the train to identify the train class, the white discs would be unfolded to show white in daylight and the lamps turned on at night. So you need to be able to turn on the front lights in the positions you are displaying the discs. If the train needed to make backing moves such as to set back into a siding the lights would stay on. Now the red lights, these were effectively unused, the end of a train was required to carry a red light, so they could be lit at the rear of a light engine, but rules required that this light was an oil lamp until very recently. The red lights should never be lit at the rear of the loco when coupled to a train, the red light has to be at the end of the train and only the end of the train. Keith Make friends in the hobby. Visit Garratt photos for the big steam lovers.
Reply to
Keith Norgrove
Thank you for that. Presumably directional lighting does make more sense on DMU units.
Mark Thornton
Reply to
Mark Thornton
Modern ones maybe, not really on green ones, they often had the destination blinds lit at both ends, and had to use oil lamps on the rear, the built in red lights not being used. So you really need: Destination blinds switchable, white markers usually on at the front only, oil tail lamp made from tiny LED that can be plugged in at either end as needed. And you need to be a dab hand with the tweezers. Keith
Make friends in the hobby. Visit Garratt photos for the big steam lovers.
Reply to
Keith Norgrove
I had wondered whether the tail lamp could be attached magnetically and removed using a solenoid on a stick (with one end closed to catch the lamp). Reverse the polarity of the solenoid to 'shoot' the lamp onto another truck.
In the case of DMUs it was modern ones I had in mind --- and one of my son's wants the Virgin livery HST for his birthday.
Mark Thornton
Reply to
Mark Thornton
It would be simple enough to fit a small rectangle of tinplate to the rear and a magnet on/in the wagon, but you would want a magnet on the lamp and a solenoid in the wagon (or a way to put your 'solenoid on a stick' on the opposite side of a piece of iron from the lamp magnet) If you want the lamp to work (yes please:-) then it would require contacts so mechanical insertion and extraction is indicated. The magnet on/in the wagon is a good idea for retaining the lamp though.
Reply to
Gregory Procter

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