Peco points and crossovers

I have recently bought Designing a layout by Barry Norman. This book has track templates so you can plan a layout, but it does not say which points
and crossovers in the templates match the Peco ones.
The point templates are A5, B6 and B8.
The Y points are 1 in 8 16ft radius, 1 in 6 8ft radius and 1 in 5 4ft radius.
The crossovers and slips are 1 in 5 3ft 6in radius, 1 in 8 8ft radius and 1 in 6 4ft radius.
Can someone please tell me which of these templates match the Peco finescale streamline points and crossovers?
Could someone also please explain why points are labelled A5 and B6 etc?
TIA
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On Fri, 31 Oct 2003 21:55:43 -0000, "Howard Cooper"

They don't.

This is the UK prototype method of describing points, the points themselves, the moving parts are designated as A, B, C etc up to H depending on their length, A are the shortest and hence have the smallest radius. H are very long, suitable for over 100mph.
The frog (or crossing has its angle defined by the length taken for a divergence of one unit, so mesuring from the point of the frog the rails are 1ft apart after 5ft for a 1:5 frog, 1ft apart after 8ft for a 1:8 frog.
The combination of point and frog defines the turnout, an A5 is a small radius normally only found in sidings, a B8 may be used in a slow speed crossover on the main, C10 and upwards for more general use.
On models we usually have to compromise with shorter turnouts than the prototype would use.
Peco don't use this geometry, to get templates for Peco contact them as they have them available quite cheaply, or you can get hold of track planning software, eg from <http://www.sillub.com/ where you can download an evaluation copy and either try it out or just print out Peco templates from the library in the programme. Keith Make friends in the hobby. Visit <http://www.grovenor.dsl.pipex.com/ Garratt photos for the big steam lovers.
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Thank you, Keith and John. The track planning software will be most usefull.
wrote:

points
1
finescale
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snipped-for-privacy@dsl.pipex.com (Keith Norgrove) wrote in message

Free in fact, in return for an SAE and the label from a length of flexitrack.
Andrew
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Howard,
A "crossover" is two points arranged so that a train running on one line can move across to another line. Is this what you mean, or do you mean "diamond crossing"?
Points are labelled A5 and B6 etc, because they are made up of "A" or "B" (etc.) switches (the movable part) and have a crossing (frog) angle of 1 in 5 or 1 in 6 etc. This is the standard way of referring to them on the real railway. Peco and Hornby points and crossings are shown by radius because it's easier for people to figure out how to fit them into their models if they are done that way. Apart from Peco Streamline points, all points can be used to replace a curve (usually second radius) in the manufacturers set-track system.
--
John Sullivan
OO in the garden http://www.yddraiggoch.demon.co.uk/railway/railway.html
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writes

points
1
finescale
******* I did mean "diamond crossing". Thanks for pointing out the difference. I am a newbie.

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And thank *you* for taking this in the spirit it was intended, and not starting a flame war as some would done.
We were all newbies once.
--
John Sullivan
OO in the garden http://www.yddraiggoch.demon.co.uk/railway/railway.html
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Further to the answers you have already had, you might be interested in the fo9llowing which I trawled up from the archives:
The most commonly used turnout design on BR is the CV9.25 (a CV switch with a 1 in 9.25 crossing). This turnout is used typically for crossovers and siding connections at wayside stations. It has a nominal radius of 245.767 metres or 10ft. 7in. in 4mm scale.
--
John Sullivan
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