Re: Model Rail Editorial

They have now embraced (belatedly but at least in a small way) modern
> technology and it is now possible to email their sales manager and their
> advertising department.
>
> In many ways Peco are quite a dynamic company these days, with a fairly
> constant stream of business acquisitions and new products. Only recently
> they had a systematic clear out of many of the traditional product ranges
> which they traditionally wholesaled over a long period.
Interestingly though, given the intial topic of conversation, at least Peco
has had a website of sorts (albeit one which was only prepared to sell you a
catalogue if you wanted to know what it was they sold as opposed to actually
presenting their wares online!) whereas a 'modern' competitor doesn't even
have that and the parent company website (Emap) tells you even less than the
Peco one!
Reply to
Michael Walker
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"Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept." wrote
Is it not useful to let people know you exist?
It would be a good medium for the readers to tell the producers what they feel about the magazine.
Maybe that's why they don't have a website!
John.
Reply to
John Turner
There's a few good reasons why a magazine would have a website of sorts (note the difference between a magazine having a website and putting your magazine on a website): * Image. There's a degree of irony in that one of the most reputedly anti-technology organisations has a passable website overall and not a bad one for BRM whilst one of the more modern styled magazines has a page exclusively for advertising websites but doesn't have one of their own! * As John said, to let the world know you exist (so called 'brochure' websites). * Better still to give potential readers and buyers an example of what they can expect if they buy your magazine. Eg sample articles, sample reviews, an outline of what the magazine contains, history of magazine, who the magazine is aimed at, etc. Not unlike the BRM site in fact! Better still, after a suitable period of time, why not put up backcopies of the magazine? I'm sure that (for example) Model Rail's business model isn't based around selling back copies or photocopying sold out issues of the mag!
In addition, there are also easy ways to build loyalty through a website in a way that a printed publication can't due to the format or lead time. Again, putting up unavailable back issues, online chats with article writers or the featured creator of this months layout to answer questions the article didn't answer, making available the email addresses of key people to provide feedback to, online surveys, bulletin boards to discuss articles, special extras for subscribers, online shop to sell exclusive reader products and so on. I'm sure others will come up with far more creative ways to sell and enhance the product to retain and increase the readership of the printed magazine as well as increase the revenue earned from each reader. Yes it requires money to put it together, but if done efficiently and thoughtfully won't cost the earth and may well be worth it in improved sales of the core product and the extras. Just ask any model shop who has a significant presence online whether the money was worth it. The Bachmann website is not particularly complex but is a frequent visit for many people I know including myself to see what's due in when.
Reply to
Michael Walker
"John Turner" wrote
Probably, but personally as only a 56k user, I don't go looking the WWW for magazines when I can get it from WH Smiths or the local newsagent (as I do). It's a bit like trying to find Xylophone in a dictionary for the first time when you DON'T know how to spell it. Where would you look (Don't start saying Google under model mags)?
As for contacting them for feedback, well the letters pages in said magazine reflect the answer - most come in by e-mail! The address is published every month at the front, or even snail mail or phone!
I agree this could all be included in a web page - giving listings of what you may find in the forthcoming edition (if say, your local shop has once again sold out and you can't look in the back (Does RM do this yet?)) but I don't think I would bother to browse... By the way, Model Rail do have a web page try :
formatting link

Reply to
Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept.
"Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept." wrote
Try putting the name of your favourite publication, manufacturer or model shop into Google and see what happens. ;-)
John.
Reply to
John Turner
I would expect a half decent researcher might look for primary sources (which might be on on the web - e.g. a set of standards). Who is to say the printed work is correct? If an author prints off his webpage, or runs it through a DTP package and sends it to a printing firm, the content doesn't suddenly become more accurate. Some genuine experts do set up a website as they can't be bothered to deal with printing, distribution, etc, and a website can evolve by review and feedback in a way which something printed can't.
What matters is being able to verify what is said to get some idea of reliability, whether by checking for something you already know (if the review of the Class X kit which I bought matches what I saw, the Class Y review might be okay), or though references to sources.
Though I suppose they aren't really webpages, I believe many academic journals are only available electronically, and other people would happily cite them.
A while ago a (genuine) mistake appeared on a webpage about railways in colonial India, which some printed sources copied, and the printed sources have now been quoted elsewhere. By ignoring printed sources and going back to some old letters at the PRO I managed to get closer to the truth - so the webpage is now more accurate than the printed sources...
Reply to
Arthur Figgis
It does indeed make a great deal of difference in being able to ascertain the facts for one's self....unlike somebody spreading their personal thoughts, right or wrong, across several newsgroups to the needless annoyance of other's.
Regards,
Colin Meredith.
Reply to
Colin
"Colin" wrote
I thought that was your angle Colin - putting the world to right that is?
Maybe no-one's trying to convince anyone, maybe they're just telling it as they see it? At the end of the day it doesn't matter where information comes from, as long as it comes and is reasonably factual.
Personally I'm just glad to be informed and to use that information to create a value-jusgement.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
What did you once say, "Bit-Bit-Bite"....??? You're quite correct though, we're all entitled to our OWN opinions without going from one newsgroup to another, etc....
> I thought that was your angle Colin - putting the world to right that is?
Reply to
Colin
> > >....unlike somebody spreading their personal > >thoughts, right or wrong, across several newsgroups to the needless > >annoyance of other's. >
> Isn't that what Usenet is for...?
Reply to
Colin
The Greeks ,of course, knew all about this and tapered their columns, it's known as epistasis (not to be confused with epistaxis, which is nose bleed). Perhaps Mr. Leigh is tapering his columns to get up people's noses?
David (game, set and match)
Reply to
David Chorley
I am not trying to convince anyone. At no time did I say I hated Model Rail (actually, of the 3 mainstream modelling magazines, I prefer it most of all for its technical information). As for putting the world to rights, its merely my opinion that what counts is the accuracy of the information, rather than how it is disseminated. I have found much information in Books, Magazines and newspapers to be accurate. Just as I have found some which has been inaccurate. I have also found much on the internet to be informative and accurate. There is also a lot of dross out there.
What saddens me most of all is one medium (whether it is a magazine, newspaper, or usenet group) decrying another, alledgedly competitive, medium simply becuase it is different. There is room for all to flourish, and our hobby is usually one portrayed as a friendly and inclusive one.
Reply to
John Ruddy
There was I hoping you wouldn't take it tooooo personal, John :-) Anyway, it was aimed at Caesar....didn't know Rome was on the East Coast;-)
Colin.
Reply to
Colin

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