The James May experience

"Fred X" wrote
Yes, agreed, but if it was properly designed why would it need extra weight?
I'm also intrigued to know why it would be necessary or desirable for it to run faster than normal, and how this could be easily achieved on what was ostensibly a pre-production model.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
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: > Are you sure? I thought that the Warship (with the Southern coaches) came : > from the shop, and that it was the Bulleid that was Oz's loco. : : I wondered that, but assuming that was the case I still assume it was a : 'used' model, which could have been quite old as they've not been available : for a while from any manufacturer. :
IIRC there was a trader flogging off their remaining stock of HO gauge Warships and Bullied coaches earlier this year!...
Reply to
Jerry
"Jerry" wrote
Maybe, but that didn't look any smaller than the other models, so doubt it was the Fleischmann model. I reckon it was either Lima or Bachmann.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
Well I don't think it was designed to run down a wet cycle track!
I did wonder that myself, but I presume that Hornby wanted to show off their new model and hoped that by running it quickly it would get their first.
Fred X
Reply to
Fred X
Id hazard a guess it was because they carried out a test run and realised that the speed of the models they had, and also the likelihood of just one model making it, was going to seriously scupper their record bid to complete it all in a day.
robbie
Reply to
robbiehead
but it didnt, you just had to think it did :) the lego was simply covering a fairly straightforward wooden structure, it wasnt holding the building up. there was no load bearing on the lego, it just had to stand up under its own weight and notice they didnt spend alot of time talking about how they fixed the floors, stairs or even the roof together.
and one of the things he would almost certainly have picked up from his trip to Legoland is to build the kind of Lego structures he wanted, to stand up to all kinds of weather and conditions,one of the things you do to keep them held together is superglue them.
maybe they did and chose not to solve them, part of the appeal of his series (part borrowed from Top Gear) is in seemingly the English eccentric with little more than a grand vision and a group of willing volunteers with sheds to help him out.
equally maybe they didnt have the time to think through the problem enough, 6episodes of this plus Top Gear and his drink programme with Oz, or the success of the scalextric episode fooled them into thinking it would be as "straightforward" to achieve, maybe the ultimate differentiator in it all was simply the weather.
robbie
Reply to
robbiehead
=A0I reckon it was either Lima or Bachmann.
As I posted before... Confident it was Lima...totally inaccurate front fairing being the 'giveaway'. Cheers Robt P.
Reply to
Robt P
: > I reckon it was either Lima or Bachmann.
: As I posted before... : Confident it was Lima...totally inaccurate front fairing : being the 'giveaway'.
....and guess what ex Lima model makes a return for 2010, yes the Cl.33 (in the Railroad range), so it could well have been supplied new by Hornby - being a 'prototype' test run of the moulds etc.
Reply to
Jerry
SNIP....
Just seen the program and that wasnt my impression. The wood in the walls was to stop the lego bricks moving horizontally it (the wood) provided no support. At one stage they showed James May in a harness walking on a lego floor several feet above the ground. Again it was pure lego with no additional support - the nth version to be designed and tested and the first on that held his wieght - although he didnt seem to have much faith in it then.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
Going by the traction tyres fitted to my mother's Hornby Sir Nigel Gresley, which dates back to the mid-1980s (it used to be my Brother's) I'd say almost certainly.
The sand that they used on the programme may have caused problems, but SNG is still on its original traction tyres, after having been played with by a kid and its more recent career of bombing round Thorpe Thewles with an average of twelve coaches on at exhibitions, it must've done more than ten actual miles by now.
Reply to
Graham Thurlwell
Very strange choice but it was in fact a maroon Bachmann D809 "Champion" 32-050DC (DCC fitted) released in 2006.
Whether the DCC decoder had been removed or retained has not been published. Presumably this was the only example of the class that Bachmann could offer, or perhaps it was provided by Buffers of Axminster who had taken responsibility for laying the track from the platform at Barnstaple to the outskirts of the town.
Riddles
Reply to
Riddles
:
: ....and guess what ex Lima model makes a return for 2010, yes the : Cl.33 (in the Railroad range), so it could well have been : supplied new by Hornby - being a 'prototype' test run of the : moulds etc. :
Duh, what the f*ck was I talking about, I had actually forgotten that Lima ever did a Warship and that we were thus talking Warship, Duh! :~((((...
Reply to
Jerry
In article , robbiehead writes
I think you are right, Robbie - I just watched the repeat of that episode tonight, and it was made quite clear that the timber structure was added purely to satisfy the insurers and building regs. It was specifically stated that it was not actually bearing any load, but was there to take the load if a part of the lego structure failed.
Still can't get over the sight of JM flushing a lego "turd" down his WC though.
David
Reply to
David Littlewood
To answer m own question =93Could you get 10 miles of track inside the O2 arena ?=94
YES easily !
Based on the dome being 365 meters in diameter, a mile is 1609 m and a spiral track with 1000mm spacing I would say about 15 =91laps=92 would do it !
Chris
Wait for it !!!!
Reply to
Dragon Heart
: : Still can't get over the sight of JM flushing a lego "turd" down his WC : though. :
Just about sums this series of programmes up. :~(
Reply to
Jerry
Good idea. There are many types of "roofing felt", not all of which is coated with sand or chippings. I've seen it's use documented for garden railways.
You could use the underlay from a multi layer felt system. The one sold by Wickes for DIY use has a self adhesive layer that may be enough to hold the track in place as well.
MBQ
Reply to
manatbandq

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