(very) Small station idea

I had an idea for a small branch line terminus station for passengers and
freight. It takes a siding from the run around loop.
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However, if I want to shunt a wagon into that siding, I would have to
move the train back onto the line. So I came up with this:
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The siding (upper) and headshunt are accessible from both sides of the
loop. Has anyone seen something like this on a real line, and do you
think it will work?
Thanks,
--James.
Reply to
James Goode
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The former would be more prototypical. Having to use the main line to shunt into a siding isn't an issue in real life, because such a small terminus would have a very limited timetable and hence the main line can be occupied with shunting movements most of the day without any problems.
The latter plan (what happened to layout2, by the way?) would be closer to prototype practice if it was the other way around, with the double slip at the left and the siding running parallel to the main line instead of the headshunt.
For safety reasons, sidings in the prototype aren't generally accessible directly from the main line - if they're facing sidings (as yours are, in both plans) then they're usually accessed via an intermediate loop that is not normally the destination of arriving trains (eg, in layout 1, trains would arrive in the top line and then be shunted via the loop to the siding). That means that any train which overruns the platform can only end up in the headshunt, not the siding, and it would require two different points to both be set incorrectly for an arriving train to reach the siding my mistake. On layout 3, an arriving train could end up in the siding if it overruns and just the slip is wrongly set, which is a much lower margin of error. A trailing siding is much safer per se, since it can never be reached by accident by an arriving train, so the access to it can be directly from the main line without needing a loop.
If you want some good examples of compact layout plans, then Carl Arendt's website at
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is one of the best. Don't be put off by the fact that it's a US site - most of the plans will work equally well in almost any setting, and many of them are explicitly illustrated in typical UK settings as well as US and European locations.
Mark
Reply to
Mark Goodge
:I had an idea for a small branch line terminus station for passengers and : freight. It takes a siding from the run around loop. : :
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: However, if I want to shunt a wagon into that siding, I would have to : move the train back onto the line. So I came up with this: : :
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: The siding (upper) and headshunt are accessible from both sides of the : loop. Has anyone seen something like this on a real line, and do you : think it will work? :
Version 1 is more proto-typical, remember that the line would be work under either the "One engine in steam" rules or by token, so having to use the running line as the head shunt doesn't matter - in fact there were many main-line or secondary lines were the running line had to be used to so extent when shunting the goods yard(s).
Also, on a real railway, with option 1 there is only one catch point and facing point lock required, protecting the run-round loop at it's left hand end, option 2 requires two catch points (run round loop and siding) as well as two facing point locks, left hand end of run round loop and the facing aspect of the double slip. A facing point lock is required, by regulation, where and when ever a passenger train will travel over a facing (diverging) point - if no lock exists then a temporary 'clip-lock' needs to be fitted before the passage of the train. Thus option one would cost the railway less to install whilst not causing any real operating problems.
Reply to
Jerry
:
: : A facing point lock is required, by regulation, : where and when ever a passenger train will travel over a facing : (diverging) point
That is, the passenger train in revenue service/carrying passengers, empty stock movements (shunts) are exempt.
Reply to
Jerry
It was a common arrangement. Many companies disn't use headshunts where they didn't need them. The siding would have been taken off the front of the loop. Vry often what looks like a hort headhunt is actually to stop runaways onto the main line, like Calne....
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Much of the time they used catch points instead like Blagdon...
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Even on double track main lines you didn't always get headshunts, like Adlsestop. This was shunted from the main line. The goods shed could be shunted from both directions.
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The short track for the loading dock would hold vans that had already gone through the goods shed.
Only the biggest goods sheds in the biggest yards were shunted by engines. The pick up goods would drop the vans and after that porters with pinch bars moved them through the shed. Or if you were lucky a horse.
Reply to
Christopher A. Lee
Layout 2 had the same track plan as layout 3, but with different dimensions.
I have tried moving the double slip and the siding, but the layout would have to be at least 20cm longer to accommodate it, and it could be more difficult to place industrial buildings. A compromise may be the best solution here.
Also, should I use an electrofrog or insulfrog double slip? I have used insulfrog points in the past, and the only locomotive to stall on them is a class 04 shunter. The smallest locomotive on this layout will be a small prairie, and the whole layout can be live all the time.
Reply to
James Goode
I'm purposely not reading the other posts yet :-) Prototype stations are built within the available space, which can be restricted. Industries generally are outside the railway's land. An exception would be coal staithes. There would usually be a railway goods shed within the station land area. A track arrangement with a double slip is possible on a very restricted site, but I think a DSP on a through line is unlikely. Probably if you can arrange a retaining wall (or perhaps a cathedral ;-) to restrict the site the DSP can be justified.
Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg.Procter
: A track arrangement with a double slip is possible on a very restricted : site, : but I think a DSP on a through line is unlikely. : Probably if you can arrange a retaining wall (or perhaps a cathedral ;-) : to restrict : the site the DSP can be justified. :
You seem to either have no knowledge of UK practice or have forgotten what you did know, the double/single slip was (still is were yards still exist) a VERY common feature of many station *running line* track plans, the 'standard' GWR and to some extent constituent lines of the Southern and LMS, the main restriction of use comes from the safety aspects of having to protect all facing points.
Reply to
Jerry
Does anyone know when this practice was established? If established late enough, perhaps the line could have been built very early, and not adjusted after it was built.
Reply to
James Goode
[ re facing point locks ] : : Does anyone know when this practice was established? If established late : enough, perhaps the line could have been built very early, and not : adjusted after it was built.
Very early, and any lines that didn't have such protection would have been banned (by law) from carrying passenger trains, so unless you wish to only run freight trains...
But heck, if you just want to 'play trains' you can pretend what you like!
Reply to
Jerry
Just tell viewers that it's a private industrial branch with passenger trains to serve workers and the workers' families that live adjacent to the works.
Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg.Procter
: : > : > : >> But heck, if you just want to 'play trains' you can pretend what you : >> like! : > : > I'll go with this. Time to buy track! : : : : Just tell viewers that it's a private industrial branch with : passenger trains to serve workers and the workers' families that : live adjacent to the works. :
Nah, the real thing would still have been covered by a 'Light Railway Order', best just excuse it all as being set in a parallel universe!...
Reply to
Jerry
Here in New Zealand, once a track passes through a gateway into private property it is (apparently) only subject to whatever standards NZR demand for the safety of their rolling stock. Privately owned branchlines are a different matter, in that being a railway they must meet the relevant govt. regulations. What I was picturing was some large industry, with a gate just off-board, a platform for the passenger trains and tracks to loading/unloading bays. That sort of thing has surely existed in Britain?
Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg.Procter
I have considered putting the buildings and platforms on small, removable boards, which would allow me to quickly change from a British station to one of another country. However, I'm worried that the joins would be too visible.
Reply to
James Goode
Unfortunately joins will always be visible to some degree. The better you get at building the less they will be visible. You can of course attempt to hide them - a removable hedge, a fence, a curb/gutter/footpath edge, parked vehicles ... One method I have used is to place thin (1/4") coloured foam rubber between the baseboards. Mount it a bit high by gluing on to one baseboard end and then trim it down to height when the scenery is done. That way at least no shadows or holes will exist when the baseboards are together.
You can also use distraction - have a couple of nude women skinney-dipping in a pond nearby and (almost) no-one will notice you've forgotten the middle baseboard. ;-)
Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg.Procter
There's no end to what you can do with those Preiser figures!
One of the layouts that does the rounds here has a complete nudist camp, with swimmers, sunbathers, volleyball players, etc. You need a *very* fine brush to finish them realistically!
Reply to
MartinS
A famous O-gauge layout's owner comissioned a well knownbuilder for some Wagons Lits sleeping cars. The first came populated with reclining nudes on the beds.
Reply to
Christopher A. Lee

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