Wagon Wheels

I'm trying to model the late 1950's.
In general terms, would pre-nationalisation open wagons and closed vans
still be running on spoked wheels or would they have been fitted with 3-hole
by then?
Thanks,
Roger.
Reply to
Roger Thomas
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As far as .. there wasnt a policy of replacing wheels. There was one of scrapping anything with grease lubrication axles. Your question is a bit general, are there any particular wagons you are interested in.
As Wolf said look at photos. One of the best sites ever ....
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Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
I've seen that too but it would have been unusual because wheels are usually turned down on the axle until the tread gets too shallow and then replaced as a pair. It would be unusual to just replace one.
Mis-matched buffers were more common.
I have a wonderful photograph John Lewis sent me of a standard gauge GWR tilt wagon. This was an early broad gauge design with metal supports for a canvas sheet (the tilt) so it looked a bit like a covered wagon from a Western movie. This has different buffers at each end.
Reply to
Christopher A. Lee
If anyone was going to post this it was going to be either me or Guy.
"Even in WW2 the wheels would have had different mileages and have worn to different disameters. "
Very true but what about adding a new rim or just letting it roll. It was wartime and the most important thing was getting from A to B !
To have two mis-matched wheels could be a talking point at shows etc
Reply to
Dragon Heart
Would have thought by late 1950's the wartime ravages would be long gone. There was heck of a lot of wagons built by then - esp steel mineral.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
True, but the early 60s on saw a lot of goods stock getting incredibly ratty, according to the photographic evidence. I don't think anything's out of the question. Guy
Reply to
Just zis Guy, you know?
But, but.....they were saying about effects of the war and the OP was asking about late 1950's :-)
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
Aye. I don't know if the rattiness of 62 had its roots in 58. I don't have enough pictures to really tell; I suspect the maintenance backlog from the war was sufficient that a lot of places never caught up but I have no sources for that opinion. Guy
Reply to
Just zis Guy, you know?
May depend on the type of wagon. OK I admit I know very little about them, but there were a heck of a lot of steel bodied mineral wagons built and few wooden ones left by then.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon

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