Whats the Best Book for beginners, track planning?

Whats the Best Track Planning Book for beginners?
Thanks,
Gary.

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"GW" wrote

It depends upon whether you want to build a trainset or a model railway and upon your chosen scale.
John.
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and
Hi John.
I am using HORNBY OO scale I think...this may sound daft, but what are the differences from a trainset and a model railway? I am a complete novice with the hobby, so still learning the ropes :)
Ta,
Gary.
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"GW" wrote

OK, I know what I mean but it's not too easy to explain.
Trainset - basic concept often a oval-based layout on a board generally around 6 or 8'0" x 4'0".
Model railway - a more serious attempt at producing something which is based on prototype track formations and train operation.
If you're looking at the former then some along the line of the Peco OO Setrack Planbook at GBP1.75 will almost certainly fulfil your needs. It's cheaper than the Hornby equivalent (and better in my opinion) and includes some sensible progressions from the basic oval.
There are other cheap book in the Peco Publications range (all priced around 1.60) which could be useful if your ambitions are more towards the model railway concept. 60 Plans for Small Layouts is one of them.
John.
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based
Hi,
I think I would like to have something which is fun to build, and looks nice afterwords - I would be come very bored with just the oval trainset, so I will be attempting to create a more substantial layout including scenery, buildings etc.
I will get a hold of the PECO publications you mention and get started!
Regards,
Gary.
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railway
based
Sensible advice on the "trainset" starting point snipped.
If you want to see what the other side of the fence (model railway) looks like, I suggest purchasing one of Iain Rice's layout design books (he's written quite a few). Its a very small investment to get an idea of what the other half do, if you like the "model railway" side, you can then take it further
- Nigel
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On Sun, 4 Jan 2004 14:00:15 -0000, "John Turner"
As a fellow neophyte,

and
both seconded. Good stuff. Also browse your local second-hand bookshop for inspiration. I found some nice layout design books and some good photographic histories with inspirations for odd corners for a few pounds each or less.
Guy ==May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting. http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk
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"Just zis Guy, you know?" Your the regular on the cycle newsgroup? Its a small Internet :)
I used the cycles groups a lot when I got my bike a year back.
Gary.
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On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 22:25:41 GMT, "Gary Whittle"

I remember, I think. Hello :-)
I'm also Just zis Guy, you know? on h2g2.com (U54363) and have been for years.
Guy ==May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting. http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk
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Hi Gary,
You might want to try and get hold of a copy of The Model Railway Design Manual by C.J. Freezer - it's published by Haynes and is a hardback book about A4 size with an orange cover.
It covers a lot of aspects of making a model railway, and does give some complete trackplans but more often gives individual sections such as variations on stations, depots, sidings, etc...
Simon
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...
I'll second that, my current project is a variation of a plan from that book, and taken as a whole - for a beginner the book provides an excellent introduction to the whole process of building a model railway. Since I got back into the hobby last year I found it to be extremely useful.
--

All the best,

Chris Wilson
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Ta :).
Will order from Amazon - saw it earlier and wasnt sure if this was a suitable book.
Cheers,
Gary.
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On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 10:47:32 GMT, GW wrote:
=>Whats the Best Track Planning Book for beginners? => =>Thanks, => =>Gary.
Firstly, think "layout design", not "track planning." Secondly, anything by Iain Rice. Thirdly, John Armstrong's Track Planning for Realistsic Operation. Despite its North American prototype base, it's full of good general principles and how to implement them, from how to utilise space efficiently, to how to adapt prototype practices to model railway designs..
Beware: layout design can become a hobby in istelf. :-)
Wolf Kirchmeir ................................. If you didn't want to go to Chicago, why did you get on this train? (Garrison Keillor) <just one w and plain ca for correct address>
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I will second that. Armstrong's book is, to my mind, the best A to Z guide to layout planning that exists. From philosophy to nuts and bolts of calculating your own civil engineering standards. It is North American, but the principals are the same.
Me being a Yankee, I found going to British outline a trip down the rabbit hole. All of my instincts were wrong. The research is a big part of the fun for me, learning something new and all that. I latched onto CJ Freezer's book, mentioned by someone else in this thread, and that filled in a lot of the basic gaps for me. Armstrong covers more ground, more thoroughly. Freezer references and explains British prototypes. For my purposes, I rely heavily on both and could live without neither.
-dave
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