White lines

I need to paint white lines on my 4mm model layout roads what is the
best method as free hand does not work very well!!
Peter
Reply to
Peter Prewett
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You could use Tamiya masking tape from your model dealer.
Reply to
MartinS
Peter Prewett said the following on 27/02/2006 04:19:
Are you sure you need to paint white lines? Have a look at a real road, and see how many lines are actually white. At 4mm scale, layouts that use a sort of grey for "white" lines look more realistic. Just a thought! Maybe using a thin white will work, so the road colour shows through.
Not a problem I have, because white lines weren't around in the periods I model!
Reply to
Paul Boyd
My roads are all freshly made and are pristine black bitumen:-)
Not even cats eyes.
Peter
Reply to
Peter Prewett
Is there anybody interested in an unused resin casting set-up? Cost about £2000, open to offers. Powerful enough to cast several 00 gauge coaches in one go. Ollie
Reply to
Ollie
Arts shops sell ball point pens with white ink, perhaps using one of these with a straight edge would do, for lines around curves, a cardboard template of suitable radius could be made up. Regards, Bill.
Reply to
William Pearce
Cut a mask in card and spray them.
Reply to
Martin Coombs
I used the tape stripes used for cars, on a roll from auto zone etc. Rob
Reply to
Rob Kemp
I keep wondering about using one of those Tippex correction roller "mouse" things - probably not available narrow enough for 4 mm though
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Adrian
Reply to
Adrian B
I used automotive pinstriping for my road lines.
-- Cheers
Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway
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Reply to
Roger T.
For what it is worth . . .
Tarred roads were marked down the centre with dashed white lines after about 1925 but even in the late 1990's there are some country roads in the wilds of Cheshire with no white line down the middle. The double white lines indicating you are not allowed to cross even when overtaking were introduced in 1957, originally in the London area. Cats eyes were first introduced in 1936, on a British N model these can be represented using 0.5mm lengths cut from a strip of 10x20 thou plastic strip. The yellow cross hatch markings at junctions first appeared in London in 1964.
Mike
Reply to
Mike
I did it once, using a mapping pen and white ink toned down with just a drop of black - 'Twas worth it as I had just seen a pic of a street painter standing looking at where he was up to - KEEP KLE
Splendid
Mike
Reply to
Mike
There are lots of unmarked roads all around the country.
Some places are (or have been) experimenting with removing existing white lines. The lack of lane definition makes drivers more cautious and they slow down.
MBQ
Reply to
manatbandq
Now *there's* a challenge for something to model! Though I suppose if 'brilliants' are available for 2mm scale head & tail lamps, they might do the job quite nicely in 4mm....
David Belcher
Reply to
deb107_york
The message from snipped-for-privacy@notigg.not.no contains these words:
That's because putting the lines in would give "lanes" just about wide enough for a push-bike.
Reply to
David Jackson
The message from " snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com" contains these words:
You *clearly* don't live in the wilds of Cheshire... It doesn't even work on the tractor drivers! Or WVM.
Reply to
David Jackson
In message , David Jackson writes
That could be interesting when tractor driver going in one direction meets WVM going in the other.
Reply to
Jane Sullivan
The message from Jane Sullivan contains these words:
Happens regularly. And, yes, it's always interesting. It's even more interesting when WVM meets Combine heading to another field...
Reply to
David Jackson
On a rural road in Ireland, I came up behind a tractor that seemed to be having difficulty squeezing by a large truck coming in the opposite direction. After several minutes, the vehicles moved on, which was when I realised the drivers had just stopped for a chat!
Reply to
MartinS
Hello.
However you do your lines, getting the sizes right will help the appearance of your model.
Current sizes in: Traffic Signs Manual, Chapter 5, or Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions (TSRGD) 2002.
Link to the first one, which also explains where different types are used:
As to how to do them, I think you can get transfers for some types, eg Give Way" triangles. Or maybe they are continental?
Hope this helps.
Cheers,
John Howell
Don't forget:
Dumfries Model Railway Exhibition 20 and 21 May 2006 Dumfries Ice Bowl DG2 9AN
Reply to
John Howell

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