Lincoln SA-200 Starter: repair or replace?

I massaged the pictures and the plugs look like the've been misfiring - do not look like there is a serious oil problem. I'd be putting a new cap and wires on with the new plugs (same heat range - are they by chance Champion J8s? I'd replace with RJ8 champions.
The "pintle" is generally referred to as the "needle", as in "needle and seat". Not talking about the micture adjustment screw here.
Reply to
clare
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Looking more at the pictures, that carb looks to be in pretty good shape, and picture 13 shows the brass "seat" removed. I have reconditioned brass seats when new ones were not readly available and the needle is steel (not rubber tipped) by very gently tapping the "head" of the needle to "reform" the seat - making sure it is scrupulously clean first, of course - but parts for that carb should still be quite readily available in the USA, so I'd just replace it and be done with it. DO shake test the float to be sure it is not leaking and full of gas - but from the pictures I very much doubt there is a problem on that front. Do NOT forget the fiber washer when installing the seat!!!!!
Reply to
clare
I agree that the condition of the plugs appears to be acceptable.
Considering that you have removed them; I suggest you replace them with new; along with new points, condenser, rotor, cap and wires.
That way you will have an almost new ignition system that should give you confiidence.
Reply to
Nadogail
OK, I will get the welder to run after these tuneups, and will see.
The old needle valve had a rubber tip.
The new one, from a NAPA kit, is bare steel and it seals against a brass piece.
I took the new one.
I had it there for perhaps 4 hours.
OK... thanks... the carb is back together, I will install it tomorrow and try.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus23779
Say Iggy..I didnt realize you were Jewish!
Interesting yarmulke you are wearing. I dont think Ive ever seen one that color before.
Gunner
Whenever a Liberal utters the term "Common Sense approach"....grab your wallet, your ass, and your guns because the sombitch is about to do something damned nasty to all three of them.
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Ah, ok. Of course that makes sense now that I think about it: water vapor inside the tank. S'why we use the gas line antifreeze up here in Canada, eh. Condensation's a real bugger...see the only experience I had with corrosion inside a tank was with my old '88 Volvo 240. Thing woulda worked better as a seive. I threw some tank putty at it and hoped it held for another year; got 3. In the end I could only fill it to less than half, and not corner too fast.
Thanks for the input guys.
Mark
Reply to
mkzero
Check carefully for crud entering the carb. Any little piece of rust or dirt or perishing rubber fuel line will wedge between the needle and seat, keeping the needle from sealing. I think in an earlier post you said there was a fuel filter. Make sure it hasn't deteriorated, and that the fuel line to the carb is in good shape.
How else are WE going to enjoy this too Ig?
Pete
Reply to
Pete Snell
I agree pretty much with what has been said. But no one told you how to test the float needle. With the bowl off, hold the carb and blow slowly into the gas inlet tube, you can add a hose if you like, tastes better, while doing this, gently move the float in and out to see if it will stop you blowing on it. Where it stops you, is where it closes. You can get a general idea where the float closes the valve by doing this. If it doesn't close it, or closes it above it's parallel position, as if it was in the operating position, you know it's bad. Dirt in the seat or just plain misadjusted is common on these types of carbs. Good luck,
Bob Noble
As I said earlier, I changed my mind and decided to rebuild this Lincoln SA-200's ignition and carb. I took some pictures
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as they will tell me how to reassemble the carb, and for asking questions below. It is my first gas engine rebuild ever, so I apologize if my questions are stupid.
1. Compression. Measured 130, 135, 135, 137 on four cylinders. How does it look?
2. Spark plugs. See above link for pictures of spark plugs. Do they tell anything interesting? Two look my blacker than the other two.
3. Carb: I called some local carb shop and asked them about the carb leaking fuel to the intake air filter. The guy told me that 9 times out of 10 they look at them in this condition, they have to replace them and something is not "seated", and it is not fixable. WTF? Is that true?
4. I took the carb somewhat apart and put it in a gallon of carb cleaner liquid that is made for soaking carburetors, with a little basket. How long should I keep that stuff in it?
5. What exactly can make the carb needle not do its job, and let excess of fuel into the intake?
Thanks guys, sorry for so many questions.
i
Reply to
Bob Noble
I have an outboard motor primer bulb on the fuel line of my tractor. When the bowl is full I can't squeeze any more gas past the valve.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Another thing that can clog jets is the sediment stirred up by tipping over. I'm OK, drove it out of the woods (barely) and then rebuilt the carb.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins

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